Event facilities – Gillan's Inn http://gillansinn.com/ Sat, 23 Oct 2021 04:13:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://gillansinn.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-favicon-2-32x32.png Event facilities – Gillan's Inn http://gillansinn.com/ 32 32 Family farms in crisis: Price controls, mega-plants, other problems “to get worse” | News, Sports, Jobs https://gillansinn.com/family-farms-in-crisis-price-controls-mega-plants-other-problems-to-get-worse-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 23 Oct 2021 04:06:18 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/family-farms-in-crisis-price-controls-mega-plants-other-problems-to-get-worse-news-sports-jobs/ KAREN VIBERT-KENNEDY / Sun-Gazette LaVerne Hoover takes cow milkers on a carosel at the Troester Dairy Farm in Mifflinburg on Friday. The farm is owned and operated by Barb, LeRoy and LeRoy Jr. Troester. Family farms, especially those in the dairy sector, are currently experiencing a crisis and it is not their fault. Between inequitable […]]]>

KAREN VIBERT-KENNEDY / Sun-Gazette LaVerne Hoover takes cow milkers on a carosel at the Troester Dairy Farm in Mifflinburg on Friday. The farm is owned and operated by Barb, LeRoy and LeRoy Jr. Troester.

Family farms, especially those in the dairy sector, are currently experiencing a crisis and it is not their fault.

Between inequitable government-controlled prices, rising equipment costs, and the growing spread of mega-facilities, the number of dairy farms has declined dramatically over the past 60 years, from over a million to less than 32. 000 today.

“The factory’s agricultural model doesn’t care about people” said Brenda Cochran, who, along with her husband, operates a dairy farm in Westfield. “He doesn’t care about homeowners who give themselves too much credit because they just want to keep farming… they’re very mechanistic. It’s almost like they’ve lost their heads, their hearts and I don’t mean they’ve lost their soul – it’s not for me to judge, but there are a lot of hard people pushing the mega-industrialized food production system. “

Cochran made his statements at an event at St. Joseph the Worker Catholic Church focused on the plight of farmers. Walter Barner of Tioga County and Beth Troester of Union County were also scheduled to speak. Area resident Carol Sides also spoke about her childhood with family members who were farmers.

Farmers’ lack of control over the pricing of their produce was addressed in a statement by Troester, which was read at the meeting.

“The government and the cooperatives control the price”, Troester wrote. “The average cost of production is not taken into account in the pricing of milk. The dairy farmer has no say.

“If we need ordered parts, we pay the shipping cost, and if we have to ship anything, we also pay the shipping cost. To have our milk collected on the farm, we pay for transportation as well as advertising, marketing and cooperative costs. … The costs of repairs, utilities, food, supplies, taxes and machine replacements keep increasing every year.

Troester noted that the average cost in this country to produce farm milk is at least $ 22 per hundredweight, or 100 pounds of milk. The price she and her husband received in September for their milk was $ 16.99 per cwt.

Farmers are paid by the quintal. There are 11.63 gallons in 100 pounds of milk.

According to Cochran, during last year’s pandemic, milk prices fell to $ 9 per cwt, which is why there have been reports of farmers throwing away milk rather than paying the costs associated with shipping it.

Cochran, who is president of Farm Women United, detailed actions the federal government has taken over the past 50 years that have affected farmers, starting with a report released in 1962 that actively tried to discourage people from farming. .

“We got our hands on what is called the CED (Economic Development Committee) report which was written by more than 100 CEOs of companies saying that we had a bad distribution of the workforce and that we had to remove these people from the farms ”, said Cochran. “One of the examples is that they were going to define the FFA programs. They were going to get people to go to college X number of miles from the farms. “

Emphasizing that the problem is politics but not partisan, as policies have been passed under the Republican and Democratic administrations over the years, Cochran said, “Everyone should be okay with the issues. They may have different ideas on how to solve them, but no one would agree that there is a problem.

“Things have really changed for family dairy farmers since the government decided that we were replaceable and the situation continues to change and not for the better”, Troester wrote. “Many dairy farmers have gone bankrupt. Very few young dairy farmers can stay in dairy farming. Dairy farmers have long suffered and struggled with low milk prices, which are always lower than the average cost of production.

Troester and her husband, LeRoy, who is 75, milk about 750 cows on their farm with their son LeRoy Jr.

“The supply chain is currently in crisis with food, supplies and parts, gas, fuel and so on. Things will get worse for everyone if something is not done, and soon, to keep our local dairy farmers on the ground. We need a fair milk price if we are to survive ”, she declared.

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With record use of beaches, parks and facilities, the Greenwich Parks & Rec Foundation is making a difference https://gillansinn.com/with-record-use-of-beaches-parks-and-facilities-the-greenwich-parks-rec-foundation-is-making-a-difference/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 21:45:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/with-record-use-of-beaches-parks-and-facilities-the-greenwich-parks-rec-foundation-is-making-a-difference/ Greenwich residents continue to spend more time outdoors in public parks, beaches, green spaces and city trails. The mission of the City of Greenwich Parks and Recreation Department is to provide high quality recreational opportunities through safe, well organized and affordable activity programs and special events. The Department of Parks and Recreation facilitates a range […]]]>

Greenwich residents continue to spend more time outdoors in public parks, beaches, green spaces and city trails.

The mission of the City of Greenwich Parks and Recreation Department is to provide high quality recreational opportunities through safe, well organized and affordable activity programs and special events. The Department of Parks and Recreation facilitates a range of recreational opportunities for all age groups that enhance the physical, intellectual, social and cultural growth and development of city residents. The ministry ensures reasonable access to all programs by closing physical and economic gaps that may hinder participation.

The Town of Greenwich Parks & Recreation Foundation was established as a private, non-profit organization to support and enhance our city’s heritage in parks, open spaces and recreation programs. It connects the community through strategic philanthropic investments and income development.

“We have had a very successful summer with a record number of people served by Parks and Recreation,” said Parks and Recreation Director Joseph Siciliano. “Now in the fall we continue to see record use of beaches, parks and facilities. The Foundation supports the city’s recreational infrastructure and the use of our facilities.

The Foundation is a tax-exempt entity designed to supplement public funding with private donations and the volunteer efforts of our community. His efforts are dedicated to the transformative experiences offered by the beauty of the outdoors, including capital and landscape improvement, as well as park development and maintenance. It also supports efforts such as improving playgrounds and picnic areas, beautification projects and special community events. Most importantly, the Foundation provides financial assistance to resident families eligible for income for participation in youth activities through the Parks and Recreation Scholarship Program.

As the city has seen increased use, the Foundation continues its efforts to engage the community of Greenwich in raising funds to support its mission and activities. J.McLaughlin celebrates its 20th anniversary in Greenwich and donates 15% of its sales to the Town of Greenwich Parks and Recreation Foundation when buyers mention “Parks & Rec” at checkout until Sunday, October 24th.

“We are very grateful for the support from J. McLaughlin,” said Siciliano. “This event is a great example of the Foundation’s efforts to connect the community to fund a variety of experiences and enable us to provide first-class amenities.

J. McLaughlin Greenwich Store Manager Kristin Kidder said, “J. McLaughlin’s culture as a business is to be good neighbors by giving back to the community. It is at the heart of our corporate mission. We are happy to share our 20th anniversary in Greenwich with the Town of Greenwich Parks & Recreation Foundation.

For more information on this event, contact Sue Bodson, Foundation Board member at [email protected] or 203-249-7233.

For more information on the Town of Greenwich Parks and Recreation Foundation, visit https://www.towngreenwichprfoundation.org.

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Oahu eases more restrictions on major events and city gyms as part of ‘cautious’ approach to reopening https://gillansinn.com/oahu-eases-more-restrictions-on-major-events-and-city-gyms-as-part-of-cautious-approach-to-reopening/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 15:41:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/oahu-eases-more-restrictions-on-major-events-and-city-gyms-as-part-of-cautious-approach-to-reopening/ HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – More restrictions on large indoor and outdoor events are relaxed in Oahu starting Wednesday as part of the city’s “cautious” push towards a full reopening as COVID-19 cases tend to rise to lower. Indoor entertainment events, such as concerts, are now permitted but must be at half capacity, with a maximum of […]]]>

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – More restrictions on large indoor and outdoor events are relaxed in Oahu starting Wednesday as part of the city’s “cautious” push towards a full reopening as COVID-19 cases tend to rise to lower.

Indoor entertainment events, such as concerts, are now permitted but must be at half capacity, with a maximum of 500 guests vaccinated. Only water can be served and it is forbidden to mingle with outside groups. Other guidelines include masking and physical distancing requirements and assigned seats.

Also starting Wednesday, outdoor “interactive” events, such as weddings and funerals, may resume with a capacity limit of 150. All participants must be vaccinated and wear masks. Groups are allowed to interact with each other, and food and drinks are allowed.

[Read the city’s new order allowing professionally-organized events]

This week also brings changes and the easing of some restrictions in some city park facilities. Sports and other activities can now take place in city gyms.

The Honolulu Department of Parks and Recreation began accepting applications for gym use permits on September 27. Prior to this change, these facilities were only approved for what the city calls “passive use”: things like meetings, arts and crafts, or stationary courtyards.

“Active use” activities are now permitted as long as you obtain the appropriate permits from the city. Spectators are allowed for these indoor activities, but it all depends on the capacity limits of each facility.

Spectators, participants, coaches and other event personnel must wear face coverings, and the Safe Access Oahu program guidelines remain in effect, which means proof of vaccination or a negative test result COVID-19 is required.

“We are delighted to continue to reopen more of our facilities as the circumstances of the pandemic improve,” said Laura H. Thielen, Director of DPR.

“This timeline provides a level of transparency and guidance that the public and park staff can follow so that we share an understanding of how park operations will progress and continue to provide respite to our community. We certainly hope that we can continue this trend of reopening the park facilities in an orderly and safe manner. “

On November 1, the authorized use of the meeting, recreation, multi-purpose and martial arts rooms in the city park will also be reopened for physical activities.

The Department of Parks and Recreation is bracing for an influx of permit applications and asking for patience as organizers begin to apply through the online portal.

Copyright 2021 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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Halloween “makes good sense”: Mayor says no county-specific rule is scheduled for October 31 https://gillansinn.com/halloween-makes-good-sense-mayor-says-no-county-specific-rule-is-scheduled-for-october-31/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 10:05:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/halloween-makes-good-sense-mayor-says-no-county-specific-rule-is-scheduled-for-october-31/ By MICHAEL BRESTOVANSKY Hawaii Tribune-Herald Ghosts and ghouls can walk among the living on Halloween, as long as they avoid large groups and people-to-people contact, state and county officials said. Mayor Mitch Roth said Monday he would not be making any county-specific rules for Halloween, instead encouraging families to simply “use common sense” to avoid […]]]>

By MICHAEL BRESTOVANSKY

Hawaii Tribune-Herald

Ghosts and ghouls can walk among the living on Halloween, as long as they avoid large groups and people-to-people contact, state and county officials said.

Mayor Mitch Roth said Monday he would not be making any county-specific rules for Halloween, instead encouraging families to simply “use common sense” to avoid spreading COVID-19.

“We’re just asking trick-or-treaters to stay in small groups, to maintain social distancing, not to knock on doors where the lights are out,” Roth said. “As long as people are doing what we’ve been doing, you should be fine.”

The state Department of Health released a list of Halloween safety tips on Monday, advising families how to celebrate Halloween without spreading COVID-19. This list of tips includes basic tips like ‘stay home if you feel sick’ and ‘wash your hands before eating candy’, but also recommends putting in some prepackaged treats for trick-or-treating. or-treaters to minimize contact and organize gatherings outside instead of inside.

The DOH also advises that Halloween costume masks are not a substitute for a sturdy nose cover and recommends that people incorporate COVID-mitigating masks into their costumes.

“Celebrating Halloween is a special event for families, and it’s safe to take steps to celebrate. Outdoor gatherings are safer and constant hand washing and mask wear are recommended, ”state health director Elizabeth Char said in a statement. “All children 12 and over can be immunized and it really is the best way to protect our children during Halloween and the next vacation.”

Roth and Char’s recommendations come a long way from last year, when Char and then-mayor Harry Kim urged residents to forgo traditional treat events altogether due to the spread of COVID.

But with the number of new cases of COVID statewide declining by the day – 117 new cases were reported statewide on Monday, including 29 on the Big Island – Roth said he made sense to continue to ease restrictions.

Roth recently announced new rules regarding the size of gatherings, increasing the maximum allowed size of outdoor gatherings from 10 to 25 people, with allowances for organized recreational gatherings of 50 people at outdoor facilities in the county. Tents and awnings are also permitted on beaches, and county lodges are usable with the appropriate user permits.

Roth’s latest rules do not include changes to the size of indoor gatherings, which remain limited to a maximum of 10 people. However, he said on Monday that he plans to increase the size of indoor gatherings soon: Starting November 1, he said, rally sizes will increase in county gyms and indoor parks, although ‘he did not specify by how much.

“We want people to move again,” said Roth, noting that increased physical activity leads to a stronger immune system.

On the other hand, the state and county should be careful not to open up too quickly, said Tim Brown, a researcher at the East-West Center at the University of Hawaii, in an interview broadcast in direct Monday.

“If we lift some restrictions and wait a few weeks and nothing changes, then we should take the next step,” Brown said. “Lifting the restrictions all at once would be potentially very dangerous. “

Brown said the state should continue to implement its Safe Travels program for visitors and residents as well as maintain all masking requirements for indoor spaces at least during the holidays.

“During the holidays, people tend to let their guard down, which gives the potential for the virus to spread, especially if families are reuniting or traveling from the mainland,” Brown said. “People should continue to mask themselves in public spaces as vaccination alone will not stop the transmission of Delta.”

Roth said there had been no further development regarding a travel program he proposed in September that would create a publicly accessible list of people who chose to quarantine themselves for 10 days rather than submit proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test from three days before arrival on the island.

However, Roth noted that the US Congress was considering a bill that would require domestic travelers to show proof of vaccination before boarding a flight. If this bill were to pass, it would render his proposed list moot.

Email Michael Brestovansky at mbrestovansky@hawaiitribune-herald.com.

Email Kelsey Walling at kwalling@hawaiitribune-herald.com.

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Michigan State Paid Critical Race Theory Advocate $ 20,000 for Hour-Long Virtual Chat: Report https://gillansinn.com/michigan-state-paid-critical-race-theory-advocate-20000-for-hour-long-virtual-chat-report/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 20:37:08 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/michigan-state-paid-critical-race-theory-advocate-20000-for-hour-long-virtual-chat-report/ Author and leading advocate of critical breed theory Ibram X. Kendi was reportedly paid $ 20,000 to speak at a one-hour virtual event last fall at the University of Michigan. Less than two months after being listed in Time magazine’s “100 Most Influential People of 2020,” Kendi, a professor of humanities at Boston University, was […]]]>

Author and leading advocate of critical breed theory Ibram X. Kendi was reportedly paid $ 20,000 to speak at a one-hour virtual event last fall at the University of Michigan.

Less than two months after being listed in Time magazine’s “100 Most Influential People of 2020,” Kendi, a professor of humanities at Boston University, was paid $ 20,000 for participating in a Zoom discussion at the University of Michigan, according to the contract obtained through a public records request by Campus Reform.

THE AUTHOR OF THE CRITICAL THEORY OF BREED ON THE FRONT OF THE AFT CONFERENCE ON CHILDREN’S EDUCATION

The contract between the University of Michigan and Kendi’s speech agency Penguin Random House provided for Kendi to speak for 45 minutes and answer questions for 15 minutes during the presentation on November 11, 2020, Campus Reform reported. The contract would have stipulated that if the event had more than 1,000 participants, the university would be charged a higher amount.

“The costs of this event were covered from the university’s general fund,” the university’s director of public affairs and internal communications, Rick Fitzgerald, told Campus Reform. “General Fund money comes from a variety of sources, including tuition and student fees, state credits, and costs recovered from sponsored research activities. It pays for the university’s education, student services, facilities and administrative support. “

The November discussion mainly focused on Kendi’s 2017 book, “Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America,” Campus Reform reported.

The description of the book on Kendi’s website reads: “From Puritan Minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant WEB Du Bois scholar to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading pro-slavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America. Contrary to popular beliefs, racist ideas are not born out of ignorance or hatred. Instead, they were designed and refined by some of the brightest minds of each era. These intellectuals used their brilliance to justify and rationalize the nation’s deeply rooted discriminatory policies and racial disparities in everything from wealth to health. “

Kendi, author of 2019’s best-selling book “How to Be an Anti-Racist”, is one of the leading figures promoting the implementation of “Critical Race Theory” in schools. The controversial line of thought teaches that racism is ingrained in all aspects of American society, often referred to as “systemic racism” on the left, and pushes for the dismantling of traditional power structures.

Kendi argued that the only way to undo systemic racism in America is to “identify and describe it in a coherent way, then dismantle it.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The University of Michigan’s Fox News and Kendi’s requests for comment were not immediately returned.

David Rutz of Fox News contributed to this report.

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The CSUDH cuts the ribbons on 4 major campus renovation projects – Daily Breeze https://gillansinn.com/the-csudh-cuts-the-ribbons-on-4-major-campus-renovation-projects-daily-breeze/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 13:00:12 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/the-csudh-cuts-the-ribbons-on-4-major-campus-renovation-projects-daily-breeze/ Consider Cal State Dominguez Hills transformed. And on Friday, October 15, university officials celebrated the transformation by cutting the ribbon on four new campus facilities. Much of the Cal State Dominguez Hills campus near Carson has spent the past four years undergoing renovations, renovations and other quality of life improvements – many of which have […]]]>

Consider Cal State Dominguez Hills transformed.

And on Friday, October 15, university officials celebrated the transformation by cutting the ribbon on four new campus facilities.

Much of the Cal State Dominguez Hills campus near Carson has spent the past four years undergoing renovations, renovations and other quality of life improvements – many of which have occurred during the height of the pandemic of coronavirus. But now that most of the construction is complete, university officials gathered with local, education and state leaders on Friday for a grand opening ceremony and simultaneous ribbon cutting for the four new facilities..

Three of the newly renovated buildings were major capital projects for the university that totaled more than $ 200 million and went down in history as the largest campus expansion in more than a decade.

“This is an extraordinary achievement not only for our campus, but for the community we serve,” said CSUDH President Thomas Parham. “We will no longer be seen as just ‘that’ university, but as a university that uplifts its community and stands as a shining beacon of education and achievement.”

And, Parham said, it wouldn’t have been possible without “the plan put together by my predecessor,” former President Willie Hagan.

Projects unveiled to the community included a renovated science and innovation building, costing approximately $ 67.85 million. The building opened to students in fall 2020, although students were only allowed on campus with limited capacity due to the coronavirus pandemic. The building has a 91,000 square foot teaching and research center. This building also includes the Toyota Center for Innovation in STEM Education, a 7,000 square foot center made possible by a $ 4 million donation from the Toyota USA Foundation.

The center includes a manufacturing lab, as well as demonstration labs for K-12 teachers.

The next major unveiling was the Innovation and education building, totaling $ 83.5 million. The 107,600 square feet, four story structure fhouses a 250-seat auditorium, collaborative learning classrooms, distance learning spaces, event spaces and offices.

It is slated to open for classroom use in the spring.

Then there is the new Resident student housing, a $ 55.87 million project. Characteristics of the housing complex 506 beds, but due to the coronavirus pandemic capacity was limited. The complex opened in the fall and is currently home to over 200 students.

On the exterior walls of the complex, eight 47-foot-high murals by an LA artist Characteristics of Iris Yirei Hu personalities such as iconic author James Baldwin.

The last is the Esports incubator lab. This will be the first Esports Incubator Lab hosted in a university library. The lab will include a broadcast booth, competition stage, and classroom with furniture and technology provided through a partnership with electronics company ViewSonic.

“That’s what esport and gaming are,” said Ruben Caputo, Managing Director of CSUDH Esport. “Create peer-to-peer relationships that will not only bridge the gap between those interested in the gaming world, but also help mentor young students interested in technology.” “

Friday’s celebration included tours of the new facilities and ended with the simultaneous cutting of four ribbons across campus.

“None of this great work,” said Parham, “would be possible without you, my amazing team and community.”

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UPMC facilities for walk-in mammography | New https://gillansinn.com/upmc-facilities-for-walk-in-mammography-new/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/upmc-facilities-for-walk-in-mammography-new/ UPMC Bedford and UPMC Altoona hospitals and the UPMC outpatient center in Ebensburg will be hosting walk-in mammography screening events next week. The events welcome walk-in mammography patients and will have a variety of vendors, tables and free items for the patients on these days. This is the third time that the facilities have hosted […]]]>

UPMC Bedford and UPMC Altoona hospitals and the UPMC outpatient center in Ebensburg will be hosting walk-in mammography screening events next week.

The events welcome walk-in mammography patients and will have a variety of vendors, tables and free items for the patients on these days. This is the third time that the facilities have hosted screening events.

Women 40 years of age and over who are eligible under their insurance for a screening mammogram, and who do not already have an upcoming scheduled mammogram, may receive one without an appointment. A doctor’s prescription is not required, but participants are encouraged to designate a doctor at the time of selection to receive and interpret the results. Those who don’t have a doctor can get help finding one. Participants’ health insurance will be billed for screening. Women without health insurance are welcome and assistance will be provided to cover screening costs. Wearing a mask is compulsory on UPMC premises.

Early detection plays a key role in the fight against breast cancer for most patients. Mammography screening event days allow women to make sure they receive an up-to-date screening and remind them to make their health a priority.

In addition to receiving their annual mammograms, patients can take advantage of a variety of providers in all three locations. Here is a list of vendors attending at least one of the three events:

• UPMC doctors

• gift bags

• free snacks and refreshments

• Dieticians

• Jewelry sellers

• Rodan + Champs

• free Reiki massages

• free blood pressure tests

• Fitness vendors

• Scentsy sellers

The Bedford hospital screening is Tuesday 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Altoona’s at Station Square Medical Center is Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Ebensburg event is Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the ambulatory center along Parcours 22.

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Keven Moore: Being proactive in maintaining the structural integrity and safety of commercial buildings https://gillansinn.com/keven-moore-being-proactive-in-maintaining-the-structural-integrity-and-safety-of-commercial-buildings/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 04:45:34 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/keven-moore-being-proactive-in-maintaining-the-structural-integrity-and-safety-of-commercial-buildings/ Many of us go to work or live in buildings older than us, and we never think twice. But when we turned on our TVs on June 26, we found that the 12 story Champlain Towers South Condominiums in Surfside, Florida had collapsed in the middle of the night, killing 98 occupants. The lessons of […]]]>

Many of us go to work or live in buildings older than us, and we never think twice. But when we turned on our TVs on June 26, we found that the 12 story Champlain Towers South Condominiums in Surfside, Florida had collapsed in the middle of the night, killing 98 occupants.

The lessons of accountability from this event are still being learned and chopped up, which I refer to in my July 8 post. The age of such buildings never tends to be a concern for most people, but in my profession we are paid to worry and lend our eyes and ears to insurers of such risks.

Insurers constantly inquire about the age and condition of a building in order to determine their appetite for insuring a particular structure and at what price to set annual premiums.

An aging barricaded commercial structure (Photo by Wiki Commons)

Thinking back to my early days at Fireman’s Fund Insurance as a loss control consultant, I still remember inspecting a handful of buildings in run down urban environments where my recommendation was to run and not to stop. The point is, many homeowners have chosen not to properly maintain their investment or simply don’t have the skills or understanding of why structural and aging issues are a concern and need to be properly addressed.

Not being a structural engineer or an architect by training, I cannot tell you for sure why some buildings last for centuries, while others cannot go beyond their three or four decades, but I can point out the importance of properly maintaining an aging building to get properly properly insured so you don’t break your bank account.

While modern building codes and structural engineering have made today’s buildings extremely safe, facility managers and building owners still need to maintain a high level of maintenance to keep them that way. As buildings age, they can lose their structural integrity which degrades over time. Thus, if simple repairs are ignored or neglected, they can turn into significant problems, potentially causing significant damage that can interrupt operations and / or even endanger occupants and others nearby.

Ongoing preventive maintenance and inspections are essential to ensure the safety and operation of buildings. According to the School for Environment and Sustainability at the University of Michigan, 72% of commercial buildings in the United States are 20 years or older. It is around this stage that insurers start to worry and demand extensive inspections of loss control properties. This is also around the time when facility managers should expect to prepare significant funds for upgrades.

Facility managers must keep a close eye on all the components that make up the functionality of a building. While it may seem that structural issues are just about the foundation and the walls, the reality is that all systems in a building need to perform well enough for the building to remain structurally sound in the long run. Many structural problems can be attributed to the following:

Older building showing decaying concrete (Photo by Wikicommons)

Concrete decay – The decomposition of concrete is natural and occurs over time as buildings age. However, there are several issues that can cause concrete to decompose prematurely, including:

Location issues – Common signs of placement issues include cracks, visible air bubbles in the concrete, pockets of rocks, honeycombs and cold joints.

Exposure – Buildings can suffer from exposure to the elements. Depending on the location, coastal sea salt or rock salt used in winter can increase the rate of concrete decomposition. Chemical deterioration can also occur as a result of acid rain due to pollution.

Wind – Excessive exposure to wind can cause the development of shrinkage cracks in the concrete and erosion of the exterior layers of the building.

Freeze / thaw cycles – These cycles moisten the concrete and cool it before there is time for proper drainage, causing expansion, chipping and delamination.

Corrosion of steel supports – When steel corrodes, it expands to create tensile stresses in concrete. Cracking, delamination and chipping are often the result.

Rotten concrete should be replaced in a timely manner. Otherwise, the building could suffer serious structural defects or collapse.

Roofing – A few factors determine the life of a roof, including the type of roof, the climate and the maintenance history of the roof. If the roof deteriorates and moisture spreads, other systems will collapse soon after. Facility managers should plan to perform a roof inspection twice a year, once when the weather is hottest and once when it is coldest.

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems – Inefficient HVAC systems can be expensive to operate and cause air quality problems, such as mold. Mold can cause structural damage as it feeds on and breaks down organic matter. When mold infests walls, insulation, paper backing or carpet, materials should be removed and replaced. Improper heating and cooling can also cause damage due to lack of efficient air circulation and ventilation.

Keven Moore works in risk management services. He holds a BA from the University of Kentucky, an MA from Eastern Kentucky University and over 25 years of experience in the security and insurance industry. He is also an expert witness. He lives in Lexington with his family and works in both Lexington and northern Kentucky. Keven can be contacted at kmoore@higusa.com

Electric – Hot spots can form if electrical wiring has loose connections, corroded wires / connectors, overloaded circuits, shorts, unbalanced electrical load, or faulty fuses, circuit breakers, and switches. Excessive heat from these hot spots could start a fire, and even a small fire can cause damage that affects structural integrity.

Plumbing – Poor plumbing can cause health risks and have adverse effects on a building and the environment. Leaks can lead to mold and water damage. Some of the significant plumbing issues that older buildings face include inefficient fixtures, poor equipment, and lead in pipes, the latter of which can contaminate drinking water.

Apart from a disaster or major event, buildings usually do not deteriorate overnight. Several preventive measures can be taken to ensure the sustainability of a structure.

These include:

Hire a good facilities manager – Facility managers must know the building better than anyone and act as the first line of defense in identifying the repairs to be made. Having a proactive facilities manager can save money and ensure buildings remain safe to occupy.

Planning of repairs and maintenance – While it may seem pointless to set aside a large sum of money for repairs that have not yet taken place, it can be beneficial in the long run when it is time for routine maintenance or when unforeseen expenses arise.

Carrying out building inspections – Inspections should be performed by qualified inspectors with site specific expertise. Inspectors should be familiar with signs of damage due to local weather conditions, such as areas with salt water or snow. Structural engineers must assess the major structural components of the building to identify the corrective actions required. They should document the inspections to allow for year-over-year comparisons of problems, making sure to take plenty of photos. Inspections should take place:

• Annually
• After any significant event, such as windstorms, earthquakes or hurricanes
• Before and after any major addition or renovation

Know the local building codes – Building codes help keep buildings safe and structurally sound. Knowing and understanding local building codes is essential so that all requirements are met. Some regulations in more difficult environments may have additional requirements.

Act on identified problems – When a problem arises, it must be dealt with quickly. Early action can reduce costs only if a problem becomes more serious. The safety of those who live or work in the building depends on the structural issues addressed and resolved.

All buildings will eventually need repairs and updates. By being proactive, facility managers can ensure the structural integrity of a building and the safety of its tenants.

Be safe my friends.

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Showplace and Market Hall in Peterborough take a cautious approach to once again welcome full capacity audiences https://gillansinn.com/showplace-and-market-hall-in-peterborough-take-a-cautious-approach-to-once-again-welcome-full-capacity-audiences/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 23:25:04 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/showplace-and-market-hall-in-peterborough-take-a-cautious-approach-to-once-again-welcome-full-capacity-audiences/ After two postponements due to the pandemic, it looks like Bruce Cockburn will finally perform again at the Showplace Performance Center in downtown Peterborough now that the Ontario government has lifted capacity restrictions for performance venues. Folk Under The Clock presents the legendary Canadian musician (pictured here performing at Showplace on September 25, 2017) on […]]]>
After two postponements due to the pandemic, it looks like Bruce Cockburn will finally perform again at the Showplace Performance Center in downtown Peterborough now that the Ontario government has lifted capacity restrictions for performance venues. Folk Under The Clock presents the legendary Canadian musician (pictured here performing at Showplace on September 25, 2017) on April 19, 2022. (Photo: Bruce Head / kawarthaNOW)

Sometimes the best news comes when you least expect it.

As she drove to her trailer for the Thanksgiving long weekend Friday (October 8), work was the last thing Emily Martin thought about – until her cell phone began to “explode” with messages. .

“I had to park on the side of the road in Orillia to check my messages and then do a bunch of work,” says Martin, general manager of the Showplace Performance Center.

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On the same afternoon, the Ontario government announced it was lifting capacity limits for concert halls, theaters, cinemas, meeting and event spaces, spectator areas of sports facilities , etc., and removed the physical distancing requirement. The changes went into effect at 12:01 am on Saturday, October 9.

For the nonprofit Showplace, that means the downtown Peterborough performance hall can once again accommodate a full audience – doubly vaccinated and masked – in its 640-seat Erica Cherney Theater, as well as smaller shows in its 100-seat Nexicom Studio space. at the lower level of the site.

The last time both spaces were filled to capacity was March 5, 2020 for Peterborough Performs: Musicians Against Homelessness, a multi-act event that raised over $ 30,000 for United Way-supported organizations. .

Members of Blackie and the Rodeo Kings bow down after a sold-out performance on February 21, 2020 at the Market Hall Performing Arts Center, one of the last concerts on the downtown performance hall before the pandemic ended any live music.  (Photo: Bruce Head / kawarthaNOW)
Members of Blackie and the Rodeo Kings bow down after a sold-out performance on February 21, 2020 at the Market Hall Performing Arts Center, one of the last concerts on the downtown performance hall before the pandemic ended any live music. (Photo: Bruce Head / kawarthaNOW)

“You see on television that hockey games are coming back with higher (crowd) abilities and the (Toronto) Blue Jays are playing in front of 30,000 people drinking beer without a mask,” Martin said of his frustration before Friday’s announcement.

“How is our space so different? What we had proposed was things like not having concessions, so people have to remain masked, as well as double check. “

“I literally spoke to them on Thursday, telling them what we stand for,” Martin says, referring to Peterborough Public Health. “I have so much respect for them. Keith Beecroft has been a Gold Star through it all. I really can’t say enough about the whole team there.

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Meanwhile, at the 350-seat Market Hall Performing Arts Center, the other non-profit performance venue in downtown Peterborough, CEO Chad Hogan said he was “shocked” by the announcement of the lifting of audience capacity limits.

“We’ve tried to prepare for various scenarios at different times over the last year and a half – going from where we were to full capacity was not something we thought we were seeing,” Hogan said, adding “It’s good news. but it creates a bunch of new questions that we need to answer to make sure we get it right. “

“Logistically, there are certain challenges that we need to discuss with our industry and at the board level. It’s a simple ad, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s easy to implement. There is some concern as to how we are going to expand all of this in a timely manner. But it’s a good kind of anxiety – well we have something to work on. “

Millbrook-native Canadian pop superstar Serena Ryder performing at a sold-out Showplace Performance Center on December 21, 2019, one of the last downtown concerts before the pandemic shut down all live music.  (Photo: Bruce Head / kawarthaNOW)
Millbrook-native Canadian pop superstar Serena Ryder performing at a sold-out Showplace Performance Center on December 21, 2019, one of the last concerts on the downtown performance hall before the pandemic hit. stop all live music. (Photo: Bruce Head / kawarthaNOW)

At Showplace, Martin says the same cautious approach to welcoming full audiences again will be a priority going forward.

“My email has been blowing up all morning (today) with people wanting to rent the space, which is great, but we can’t turn a giant place in no time,” she says, noting that most of its staff are still laid off. .

“We ask people to be patient with us. We hadn’t noticed this was going to happen. We have a giant building that needs to be cleaned up. The working at heights training for our technicians has expired. They must be recertified before they can take the theater lights apart and clean them. “

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Despite the challenges, Martin says Showplace is “excited” about the development.

“We are excited and happy. It is much easier to do our planning. It’s nice to have the freedom to be able to plan. We’ve known for months that we have all of this work ahead, but it took a lot of rushing and waiting. You don’t want to turn off the theater lights and clean them and then wait another six months. We’re not quite ready for it, but now we know when we’re ready, we can go.

When Showplace audiences return to the main theater, they will settle into brand new seats that will be set up at the end of October.

“We’re basically opening a new auditorium, which is so nice,” says Martin.

Whitehorse performing at Market Hall Performing Arts Center on April 19, 2018 (Photo: Bruce Head / kawarthaNOW)
Whitehorse performing at Market Hall Performing Arts Center on April 19, 2018 (Photo: Bruce Head / kawarthaNOW)

For Market Hall, Hogan says the focus is on the success of returning audience members.

“We want to make sure that the logistics don’t take away the joy of the experience,” he explains. “Because we unequivocally respect the vaccine passport, what we need to determine now is the best way to streamline this process. “

“No one wants to sit there for two hours waiting to enter the place. We are going to be aware of the experience as we determine what we can handle. “

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As Martin and Hogan both begin the small steps necessary to once again welcome an audience at full capacity, a big question remains: When will the shows be booked for both venues again?

“We’ll probably start with a few shows that are a bit smaller, and gauge from there what we’re capable of – but we’ll most definitely see shows here in January and beyond,” Hogan said, noting the latest The Show. in its hall was a performance by Trent University’s Anne Shirley Theater Company, held the week the pandemic was declared.

Martin, meanwhile, assures Showplace “is going to be a busy place” in January, adding “We have a lot on the books” for early 2022.

Martin and Hogan suggest people check their venues’ websites – www.showplace.org and markethall.org – regularly for reopening updates and concert announcements.

When audiences return to the Showplace Performance Center's Erica Cherney Theater, they will be seated in new seats thanks to a donor-funded renovation to the non-profit performance venue in downtown Peterborough.  (Photo: Paul Rellinger / kawarthaNOW)
When audiences return to the Showplace Performance Center’s Erica Cherney Theater, they will be seated in new seats thanks to a donor-funded renovation to the non-profit performance venue in downtown Peterborough. (Photo: Paul Rellinger / kawarthaNOW)

“It’s been a chore,” Martin says over the past 19 months, attributing the board members and staff at Showplace – and, yes, Hogan too – to having been “a sounding board” for a period of time. hard time.

“Pivot is a word I hope I will never hear again in my life. Mentally, this has been the most difficult thing I have had to deal with in my life.

“Knowing that we have been through, I hope the worst is enormous. We worked so hard to get there. Now we just have to be patient and make sure we’re ready for it (hearings at full capacity).

For his part, Hogan admits there hasn’t been a day he hasn’t thought about the possibility of Market Hall never reopening.

“There was a lot of pressure without any real sense of control,” he recalls.

“We did everything we could to keep our heads above water. Fortunately, with the support of the federal government, we are able to open up in a way that we believe is representative of what we are historically known for.

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City of Oakland | REMINDER! Important reports scheduled for 11/10 … https://gillansinn.com/city-of-oakland-reminder-important-reports-scheduled-for-11-10/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 17:01:14 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/city-of-oakland-reminder-important-reports-scheduled-for-11-10/ MACRO Along with my colleagues on the Public Safety Committee, I asked the city administration to implement previous council directives and create a way to continue funding the civilian responders in the Oakland crisis – MACRO. In July, city council accepted and allocated $ 10 million in additional public funding, which I successfully requested on […]]]>

MACRO

Along with my colleagues on the Public Safety Committee, I asked the city administration to implement previous council directives and create a way to continue funding the civilian responders in the Oakland crisis – MACRO. In July, city council accepted and allocated $ 10 million in additional public funding, which I successfully requested on behalf of MACRO. This funding will allow Oakland to better launch MACRO as a well-funded civilian crisis responder program and enable the Oakland Police Department (OPD) to respond to violent priority calls.

After listening to lots of community feedback, our MACRO update request will include:

1) Include a community advisory board to serve as a board

Partnered with the Oakland Fire Department as the council expressed its intention to create in

Resolution number 88553 CMS and to be referred to the board if necessary with

Appropriate legislation;

2) Guarantee a competitive wage and salary structure for jobs, i.e. jobs for

Frontline responders and bring them in as soon as possible;

3) A plan to extend MACRO to a 24 hour a day, 7 day a week program;

4) Strategy (and staffing) to seek additional funds to continue / expand MACRO;

5) Revised expenditure plan

Agenda: link

Exit OPD special events

I, along with council member Fife, scheduled a report from the city administrator on the status of implementation of the July 2020 council directive, which I presented, to transfer special events allowing out of the Oakland Police Department as of October 12, 2021, Public Safety Committee Meeting. Several community members and organizers shared their strong support for the removal of the OPD’s special event authorization due to costly police fees. In addition, I have continuously asked the OPD to focus on responding to and investigating crimes and missing persons. As KQED reports, “Critics of the current policy are frustrated: in the years leading up to the pandemic, Oakland used up to 84% of its festival and fair funds to pay for security at the police department instead. to directly support artists and cultural institutions. . This police-run licensing system is prohibitive and unfair, critics say. They argue it is hurting opportunities for artists and small businesses, hampering Oakland arts and culture and related industry, and slowing the resumption of pandemic restrictions. “

City staff created a ‘one-stop-shop special event permit application’ project

and an investigation. They are soliciting community feedback on the new app can be found here:

https://www.oaklandca.gov/news/2021/seeking-community-feedback-on-updates-to-the-specialevents-permitting-process. Staff intend to use the comments in fall 2021 in the final request.

Article: link

Instagram OPD Case

This report will provide information on the investigation and findings of the use of an Instagram account by current and former Oakland Police Department (OPD) officers. The Instagram account contained deeply offensive, sexist and racist content, but was ignored by management who reviewed it until investigative journalism brought the actions to the public attention. Read the articles on this important question: Link & Link

Article: link

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