Event facilities – Gillan's Inn http://gillansinn.com/ Wed, 04 Aug 2021 22:33:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://gillansinn.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-favicon-2-32x32.png Event facilities – Gillan's Inn http://gillansinn.com/ 32 32 Regional Health Command-Pacific Soldiers Win Top US Army Medical Command Leader Challenge | Item https://gillansinn.com/regional-health-command-pacific-soldiers-win-top-us-army-medical-command-leader-challenge-item/ Wed, 04 Aug 2021 22:29:55 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/regional-health-command-pacific-soldiers-win-top-us-army-medical-command-leader-challenge-item/ 1/5 Show legend + Hide caption – Regional Health Command-Pacific, represented by Capt.Jason Christman, 1st Sgt. Amy E. Davis, Staff Sgt. Israel R. Rivera and Spc. Jarrett P. Rodriguez. The team won first place in the 2021 U.S. Army Medical Command Best Leader Competition. (Photo credit: US Army) SEE THE ORIGINAL 2/5 Show legend + […]]]>








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Regional Health Command-Pacific, represented by Capt.Jason Christman, 1st Sgt. Amy E. Davis, Staff Sgt. Israel R. Rivera and Spc. Jarrett P. Rodriguez. The team won first place in the 2021 U.S. Army Medical Command Best Leader Competition.
(Photo credit: US Army)

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2021 US Army Medical Command Best Leader Competition








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1st sergeant. Amy Davis, a combat medic with US Army Medical Department activity in Korea, climbs a rope during the 2021 US Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Best Leader Competition, July 26, 2021, at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. The 2021 MEDCOM Best Leader Competition was held July 25-30, 2021 at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.
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Captain Jason Christman, assigned to the Desmond T. Doss Health Clinic in Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, completes the Army Combat Aptitude Test during the 2021 Army Best Chief Medical Officer competition on July 26, 2021. In addition to taking first place as a team, Christman also won first place as an individual in the officer category.
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Staff Sgt. Israel Rivera, a combat medic with the Desmond T. Doss Health Clinic, climbs an obstacle during the 2021 US Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Top Leader Competition, July 26, 2021, in Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. The 2021 MEDCOM Best Leader Competition was held July 25-30, 2021 at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.
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CPS. Jarett Rodriguez, combat medic at the Desmond T. Doss Health Clinic, maneuvers through an obstacle during the 2021 US Army Medical Command (MEDCOM) Top Leader Competition, July 26, 2021, at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii.
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SCHOFIELD BARRACKS, Hawaii – Three soldiers from the Desmond T. Doss Health Clinic (DDHC) and one from the US Army Medical Activity-Korea took first place in the 2021 US Army Medical Command Best Leader competition here today ‘hui.

Captain Jason Christman, 1st Sgt. Amy Davis, Staff Sgt. Israel Rivera, and Spc. Jarett Rodriguez faced teams from Regional Health Command-Europe, Regional Health Command-Central and Regional Health Command-Atlantic in a week of grueling physical and mental events.

“The only reason we succeeded in this competition is because we came together as a team,” said Captain Jason Christman, optometrist at DDHC. “We were all exhausted, both mentally and physically, but we came together as a team and held each other up. “

The week-long competition consisted of several events, including day and night land navigation, an Army combat aptitude test, written exam, medical lanes and even a mystery event.

“We were able to prepare for the events we were experiencing, but we were all nervous about the mystery event,” said Staff Sgt. Israel Rivera, a combat medic with DDHC. “It turned out to be a kayaking event that really pushed us to our limits and then passed them. “

The U.S. Army Medical Command designed the competition events to test teams’ medical abilities, such as casualty response, as well as their tactical skills as soldiers, such as marksmanship. In addition to mastering medical training, combat medics must be able to integrate seamlessly into combat units across the military.

“We’re soldiers first, and that means we have to be prepared to do whatever we’re called to do,” said 1st Sgt. Amy Davis, combat medic with medical activity in the United States Army – Korea. “Fortunately I have an amazing team and we were able to rely on each other to get through the competition. “

As the team spends their normal workdays focusing on patient care, they had to train for the event outside of duty hours.

“We had to integrate our training whenever we could,” said SPC. Jarett Rodriguez, a combat medic with DDHC. “Because we take care of patients during the shift day, we find time to practice in the morning before the clinic opens, in the evenings and even on weekends to make sure we were ready. “

The group recognized teamwork as the key to success. Having an officer, first sergeant, non-commissioned officer and junior soldier on the team allowed the group to take advantage of different skills and perspectives to win the competition.

“The fact that we are of different ranks, that we have different experiences and that we come from different career fields makes us a stronger team,” explained Rivera. “No matter what we were up against, we knew we could count on each other. Teamwork is the only reason we won first place.

In addition to taking first place as a team, two members of the Regional Health Command – Pacific team won in their respective individual categories. Christman took first place in the officer category and Rodriguez took first place in the junior enlisted category.

Regional Health Command-Pacific, headquartered at JBLM and Honolulu, is the most geographically dispersed command in military medicine, spanning more than 5,000 miles and five time zones across the Pacific.

The command oversees Army medical treatment facilities and units in the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, Hawaii, Japan and South Korea.

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Performance Food Group Company to Host Fourth Quarter and Fiscal 2021 Results Webcast | Company https://gillansinn.com/performance-food-group-company-to-host-fourth-quarter-and-fiscal-2021-results-webcast-company/ Tue, 03 Aug 2021 12:02:12 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/performance-food-group-company-to-host-fourth-quarter-and-fiscal-2021-results-webcast-company/ RICHMOND, Virginia – (BUSINESS WIRE) – August 3, 2021– Performance Food Group Company (PFG) (NYSE: PFGC) will host a live audio webcast at 9 a.m. ET on Thursday, August 19, to discuss its fourth quarter and fiscal 2021 financial results. PFG will issue a press release with these results around 7 a.m. ET the same […]]]>

RICHMOND, Virginia – (BUSINESS WIRE) – August 3, 2021–

Performance Food Group Company (PFG) (NYSE: PFGC) will host a live audio webcast at 9 a.m. ET on Thursday, August 19, to discuss its fourth quarter and fiscal 2021 financial results. PFG will issue a press release with these results around 7 a.m. ET the same day.

George Holm, Chairman of the Board, President and CEO of PFG, and Jim Hope, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, will discuss the company’s fourth quarter and fiscal 2021 results and answer questions from the community investors and the media.

The webcast will be available in listen-only mode at investors.pfgc.com. Registration prior to the event is required. An archived copy of the webcast will be available later the same day.

About Performance Food Group Company

Building on the many proud stories of our family of companies, Performance Food Group is a leading customer-centric food service distribution company headquartered in Richmond, Virginia. Founded on roots stretching back to a grocery hawker in 1885, PFG today has a nationwide network of more than 100 distribution facilities, thousands of talented associates and trusted suppliers across the country. In an effort to help our customers prosper, we market and deliver quality food and related products to over 200,000 locations, including independent restaurants and chains, schools, businesses and industries, establishments health care vending machines, office coffee service vending machines, big box retailers, theaters and convenience stores. Building strong relationships is at the heart of PFG’s success – from connecting associates with excellent career opportunities to connecting valuable suppliers and quality products with the broad and diverse customer base of PFG. To learn more about PFG, visit pfgc.com.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210803005605/en/

CONTACT: Investors:

Bill marshall

Vice-President, Investor Relations

(804) 287-8108

bill.marshall@pfgc.com Media:

Trisha meade

Director, Communications and Engagement

(804) 285-5390

mediarelations@pfgc.com

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA VIRGINIA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: TRUCKING SUPPLY CHAIN ​​MANAGEMENT RETAIL RESTAURANT / LOGISTICS BAR / FOOD / DRINK TRANSPORT SUPPLY CHAIN ​​MANAGEMENT

SOURCE: Performance Food Group Company

Copyright Business Wire 2021.

PUB: 03/08/2021 8:00 a.m. / DISC: 03/08/2021 8:02 a.m.

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210803005605/en

Copyright Business Wire 2021.

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Smithsonian Magazine Announces 17th Annual Museum Day, Celebration of Limitless Curiosity | https://gillansinn.com/smithsonian-magazine-announces-17th-annual-museum-day-celebration-of-limitless-curiosity/ Fri, 23 Jul 2021 21:20:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/smithsonian-magazine-announces-17th-annual-museum-day-celebration-of-limitless-curiosity/ NEW YORK – Smithsonian magazine has designated September 18 as the 17th Annual Museum Day, an initiative in which participating museums across the United States open their doors for free to those who download a signature ticket. The annual event allows museums, zoos and cultural centers in all 50 states to emulate the spirit of […]]]>

NEW YORK – Smithsonian magazine has designated September 18 as the 17th Annual Museum Day, an initiative in which participating museums across the United States open their doors for free to those who download a signature ticket. The annual event allows museums, zoos and cultural centers in all 50 states to emulate the spirit of the Smithsonian Institution facilities in Washington, DC, which offer free admission daily. This year’s event is sponsored by The Quaker Oats Company.

Museum Day goes beyond getting visitors through museum doors – it acts as a stepping stone to empower and help advance the hopes and ambitions of the public, especially school-aged children and children. under-represented communities. It represents a national commitment to access, equity and inclusion.

With many public spaces closed for a year or more, Museum Day 2021 celebrates the reopening of museums after lengthy closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This year’s theme, Experience America, represents the return and resurgence of our country’s diverse cultural experiences, in the safest way possible. Although tickets are free, participating museums will have security measures in place for this year’s event so that guests can enjoy their experience safely and comfortably.

“As we begin to feel a sense of normalcy in our day-to-day lives, we are honored to once again welcome the public to the Smithsonian Museums in Washington, DC and New York, and to museums across the country this World’s Day. museums, ”said Amy Wilkins. , Director of Revenue at Smithsonian Media. “In a year that has challenged us in unprecedented ways, we hope this year’s event serves as a reminder of the people, places and cultural experiences that have the power to unite us all.”

Additionally, this year Quaker is sponsoring Museums Day to further strengthen the event’s mission of making cultural and educational experiences accessible to all. From July 6 to September 15, 2021, Quaker will be running a Back to School Instant Rewards program in which participants will have the chance to win one of one hundred Smithsonian Science kits per day. Quaker will also be hosting an Instant Grand Prize in which five adults will each win a virtual tour of the Smithsonian Museum and a private question-and-answer session with a museum educator for up to 35 participants. For more information and official giveaway rules, please visit QuakerBacktoSchool.com.

“At Quaker, we are committed to nurturing lives and helping people reach their full potential,” said Kristin Kroepfl, vice president and chief marketing officer of Quaker Foods North America. “We are thrilled to partner with Smithsonian Magazine to provide educational experiences for families and students across the country and help foster an unlimited appetite for knowledge. “

More than 1,000 museums are expected to participate in Smithsonian Magazine’s 2021 Museum Day, the largest event of its kind. Those wishing to attend and participate in Museums Day 2021 can visit Smithsonianmag.com/museumday to learn more and download a Museum Day ticket starting August 18, 2021. Each ticket grants to the ticket holder and one guest free access to any participating museum in September. 18, 2021. Only one ticket is allowed per email address. A list of participating museums, which will be continuously updated, is available at Smithsonianmag.com/museumday/search.

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Conservative radio show host Larry Elder to be on recall ballot in California https://gillansinn.com/conservative-radio-show-host-larry-elder-to-be-on-recall-ballot-in-california/ Thu, 22 Jul 2021 01:02:16 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/conservative-radio-show-host-larry-elder-to-be-on-recall-ballot-in-california/ There are now 43 recall candidates in California, after a judge ruled on Wednesday that conservative radio talk show host Larry Elder can be put on the ballot. Voters will decide on September 14 whether Governor Gavin Newsom (R) should remain in office or be replaced by one of the recall candidates. On his show […]]]>

There are now 43 recall candidates in California, after a judge ruled on Wednesday that conservative radio talk show host Larry Elder can be put on the ballot.

Voters will decide on September 14 whether Governor Gavin Newsom (R) should remain in office or be replaced by one of the recall candidates. On his show last week, Elder announced he would run for governor and, by the Friday deadline, submitted his documents and five years of tax returns. The Secretary of State’s office released a list of candidates on Saturday night, and Elder was not one of them; the office later told its campaign that Elder’s tax returns were either incomplete or poorly submitted, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Under a 2019 law, anyone running for state office in California must file their tax return in order to be entered in the primary ballot, and Elder sued the secretary of state, saying that shouldn’t not be a requirement for a recall election. Judge Laurie M. Earl ruled in his favor on Wednesday, saying: “I do not find at all that Mr. Elder was required to file income tax returns.”

Another candidate, Kevin Faulconer, was not so lucky. The secretary of state’s office said he could not be listed on official election documents as “retired mayor of San Diego” because he now works at Pepperdine University as a guest speaker and business consultant. The secretary of state’s office said Faulconer should be listed as a “businessman / educator” and the California Democratic Party said it was misleading for Faulconer to be called a “retiree” because he is still working.

Judge Shellyanne Chang agreed, and Faulconer will not be described on the documents as “retired mayor of San Diego.” His campaign said voters have “the right to transparent and accurate information about Mayor Faulconer’s case” and that “the decision defies common sense.”

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Minot Region Arts Council Secures Future Carnegie Lease | News, Sports, Jobs https://gillansinn.com/minot-region-arts-council-secures-future-carnegie-lease-news-sports-jobs/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 05:02:35 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/minot-region-arts-council-secures-future-carnegie-lease-news-sports-jobs/ Jill Schramm / MDN The Carnegie, a 110-year-old historic building, will be managed by the Minot Area Council of the Arts. The Carnegie building in Minot will be under new management on September 1. Minot city council voted on Monday to approve a two-year lease for the building to the Minot Region Arts Council. Rent […]]]>

Jill Schramm / MDN The Carnegie, a 110-year-old historic building, will be managed by the Minot Area Council of the Arts.

The Carnegie building in Minot will be under new management on September 1.

Minot city council voted on Monday to approve a two-year lease for the building to the Minot Region Arts Council.

Rent is based on a percentage of event revenue generated by the facility.

The Carnegie Association currently has a 10-year lease that expires August 31.

According to a memo to council, city staff have heard concerns from the public about the non-responsiveness and inaccessibility of renting the facility for events. The facility also needs to be cleaned and maintained.

“We have a great advantage in this facility. The city itself has invested quite a bit of money in some repair work at the facility over the past few years ”, City manager Harold Stewart said. “There are still repairs to be done. The intention of this agreement was to be in a way a benefit and a plus for the city as well as for the Arts Council of the Minot region. “

Justin Anderson, executive director of MACA, said MACA will host some of its own programming at Carnegie and seek tenants. The hope is that the facility will generate enough revenue to enable improvements to the building that will put it on a par with other event facilities, he said.

Because the Carnegie hasn’t been in the public eye as much as it could be, it’s unclear how many additional uses could be obtained, Anderson said. MACA will review certain aspects of the building’s current operation, including the price list.

Board member Lisa Olson forwarded a question to the community about whether religious organizations would still be able to lease the building under MACA management.

Stewart said the city attorney has yet to be able to answer the question, but understands that as a public building, the Carnegie Center cannot be rented out to a religious organization.

“This has been my experience with legal advice in the past, this is not an appropriate use of a city owned establishment, and you are potentially considering potential litigation if someone were to complain and voice their concerns to this subject”, he said.

Built in 1911 as a library, the Carnegie Center in Minot is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It served as a library until 1965. For a time it served as a center for the elderly.

Mayor Shaun Sipma said renting from MACA was a prudent step to help the facility become a more used space.

“There are a lot of opportunities in this building. It’s just underutilized at this point ”, he said.

“It needs a lot of work, not just a deep cleaning, but the floor of the facility is past its lifespan” he added. “If you walk through the building, there’s just a ton of maintenance that hasn’t been done. I know that MACA has its hands full to embark on this path.

The latest news today and more in your inbox

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Select businesses in downtown York to receive Bloom grant funds https://gillansinn.com/select-businesses-in-downtown-york-to-receive-bloom-grant-funds/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 18:17:06 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/select-businesses-in-downtown-york-to-receive-bloom-grant-funds/ Some businesses in downtown York have been selected to receive Bloom Grant funding from Downtown Inc. to help them recover or grow their businesses. Downtown Inc announced the recipients of the 2021 Downtown Bloom Grant in a press release. The 10 downtown businesses that will receive funding, and what they plan to do with it, […]]]>

Some businesses in downtown York have been selected to receive Bloom Grant funding from Downtown Inc. to help them recover or grow their businesses.

Downtown Inc announced the recipients of the 2021 Downtown Bloom Grant in a press release. The 10 downtown businesses that will receive funding, and what they plan to do with it, include:

  • A Chinatown Express: purchase of new kitchen equipment
  • C&P Media LLC: purchase of new video equipment
  • Trust by CC: improvement of the attractiveness / creation of places, improvements in lighting; and security upgrades
  • Lori V’s Pizza and Fried Delicacies: purchase of a new convection oven and upgrade of the point of sale
  • Mr. Elene Vintage: updated exterior lighting and yard space improvements
  • Mudhook Brewing Company: purchase of a two-way indoor fireplace
  • Egyptian food from Neama: purchase of new equipment
  • Our Sons and Daughters LLC: investment in a new range of products, renovation of existing facilities and strengthening of marketing capacities
  • Sattva Mediation and Yoga Center: facades with new signage, furniture for registration and shelves for merchandise
  • Grills of the world: purchase of new equipment and interior renovations
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Imperial Supplies celebrates opening of larger distribution center – Salisbury Post https://gillansinn.com/imperial-supplies-celebrates-opening-of-larger-distribution-center-salisbury-post/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 04:08:08 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/imperial-supplies-celebrates-opening-of-larger-distribution-center-salisbury-post/ SALISBURY – After several decades in its Litton Drive distribution center, Imperial Supplies began in 2019 looking for a facility with more space. The truck parts supplier, a subsidiary of Fortune 500 WW Grainger, wanted to stay close to its employee base in Salisbury. This is why she has limited the scope of her real […]]]>

SALISBURY – After several decades in its Litton Drive distribution center, Imperial Supplies began in 2019 looking for a facility with more space.

The truck parts supplier, a subsidiary of Fortune 500 WW Grainger, wanted to stay close to its employee base in Salisbury. This is why she has limited the scope of her real estate search to a radius of 25 miles.

It was too far for Rod Crider, chairman of the Rowan Economic Development Council.

“It’s outside of Rowan County so we’ve worked really hard to keep them here,” Crider said.

In April, Imperial Supplies announced it would relocate its operations to a 150,000 square foot building off Chamandy Road in the Granite Quarry Industrial Park, just 7 miles from its old warehouse.

The company held a groundbreaking ceremony Monday morning to celebrate the inauguration of the new distribution center. The event brought together representatives from the company’s headquarters in Green Bay, Wisconsin, including CEO Rob Gilson and Chairman Gregg Sterling.

“(Today) is important because it shows the growth we’ve experienced and most importantly the people who are supporting it,” Gilson said. “Growth creates opportunities for our associate base and as you can see we have a lot of great associates here who take care of these clients every day. It’s a great day. It’s a big day for us, a big day for Salisbury.

The fact that Imperial Supplies chose to stay in Rowan County was a victory for Crider and his team at Rowan EDC. The company’s decision to move to the Granite Quarry industrial park made it even more enjoyable.

“What particularly appeals to us is that (Imperial Supplies) has chosen this facility,” said Crider. “This installation was the result of a joint effort between the Rowan County Council of Commissioners, the Town of Granite Quarry and Easter Creek Partners. This was the first time these three groups had come together to build this first specification building.

The 80-acre industrial park is Rowan County’s newest. This was made possible after Rowan County bought the land from Gildan, who is currently the only other tenant in the park. A second 100,000 square foot speculative building is currently planned on land near the Imperial Supplies facility.

Imperial Supplies moved operations from its Litton Road facility to its new distribution center over the course of four weekends. Despite the transportation of parts, equipment and people, the company continued to ship products to its customers throughout the move.

“We didn’t miss a thing,” said Sara Vestal, head of the distribution center. “We operated from both facilities and we did not disappoint a single customer. “

The warehouse formerly occupied by Imperial Supplies at 1335 Litton Drive has already found a new tenant at MaxLife Industries, who announced an extension in the building last week.

The 150,000 square foot Imperial Supplies facility, which is triple the size of the old warehouse, will give the company more space to meet growing customer demands. The distribution center is one of five operated by Imperial Supplies in the United States

“As we grow the business we need more space,” Gilson said. “We need a picking, packing and shipping capability and that gives us those capabilities. Add to that our facility in Scranton, PA, it covers the east coast and we can continue our double-digit revenue growth every year. “

Imperial Supplies ships truck parts and fleet maintenance supplies, which can range from nuts and bolts to electrical tape.

“Anything that will serve a fleet industry, a fleet of vehicles, we sell it,” Vestal said.

With the move to larger facilities, Imperial Supplies has increased its workforce to nearly 40 employees. The company is still recruiting for three positions. Vacancies are for material handlers, who walk 7-9 miles per day to move products to and from warehouse shelves.

In addition to more space, the installation on Chamandy Drive also has several new features that will benefit company employees, including charging stations for 11 “Cherry Picker elevators” and six forklifts. The machines are used by certified drivers to transport large boxes of product around the facility, including on shelves that nearly reach the warehouse’s nearly 30-foot ceilings.

The dozens of employees who make up the warehouse attended the grand opening ceremony and even got to enjoy a piece of cake before returning to work.

More information on Imperial supplies can be found online at www.imperialsupplies.com.

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Kids Learn at Science Saturday Event at Weber State Ott Planetarium | Education https://gillansinn.com/kids-learn-at-science-saturday-event-at-weber-state-ott-planetarium-education/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/kids-learn-at-science-saturday-event-at-weber-state-ott-planetarium-education/ OGDEN – With a strong exhale and a soft “wow” scientific curiosity flourishes. Parents and children deposited in the Ott Planetarium in the Lind Lecture Hall at Weber State University over the weekend for the second “Scientific SaturdayOf the summer. The July event included a 30-minute presentation in the current planetarium and two activity booths. […]]]>

OGDEN – With a strong exhale and a soft “wow” scientific curiosity flourishes. Parents and children deposited in the Ott Planetarium in the Lind Lecture Hall at Weber State University over the weekend for the second “Scientific SaturdayOf the summer.

The July event included a 30-minute presentation in the current planetarium and two activity booths. The event was comprised of staff from the Ott Planetarium, all of whom are current or recent graduates of Weber State, and John Armstrong, director of the planetarium and professor of physics.

“We like to do it because it makes people aware of what’s going on at the planetarium. We can try new activities for the kids, we can show the planetarium shows, ”Armstrong said.

The first table contained stacks of papers, soon to be brochures, on different constellations that the children could fold and keep with them, each with a picture and information about a different celestial formation, from Orion to Ursa Major.

A few feet away, other workers were seated with a line of homemade lava lamps. The lamps, made from a 2-liter bottle filled with a mixture of food coloring and cooking oil, would bubble and react with the addition of Alka-Seltzer tablets.

The event was part of a summer series of free activities funded by the Weber County RAMP program and promoted to students and families by the Ogden School District. According to the Weber County website, the purpose of the RAMP tax is to provide opportunities through recreation, the arts, museums, and parks.

For Terri Holmes, one of the many parents who brought their children to the planetarium, this was the perfect opportunity to involve the children in an interesting and educational summer activity. She brought three children, ages 5 to 13, to join in the fun.

“Knowing that these things are available is really nice and it’s good for a wide range of ages,” she said.

The Holmes family were excited to witness the new show at the planetarium, a behind-the-scenes look at the different jobs and people at an observatory in Chile. Holmes added that this was one of the many RAMP events his family has already attended this summer.

This year was the return of Science Saturdays to Weber State after the summer 2020 events were canceled due to COVID-19. The next and last Scientific Saturday at the Planetarium will be on August 14 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Free summer events supported by Weber County take place weekly and can be viewed on the site county site.

While the staff can hope everyone walks away from the event with a lifetime of science ahead, they are more than happy that attendees leave more curious than when they entered.

“No matter what they end up doing, I really hope they, at a minimum, read about science and explore science all their lives,” Armstrong said. “If they become scientists, it’s even better.

You can reach the journalist Harrison Epstein at hepstein@standard.net. Follow him on Twitter at @harrisonepstein.

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Presidio remodel, controversial conversations top Superintendent’s priority | Characteristics https://gillansinn.com/presidio-remodel-controversial-conversations-top-superintendents-priority-characteristics/ Sun, 18 Jul 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/presidio-remodel-controversial-conversations-top-superintendents-priority-characteristics/ PAYETTE – Even when she’s not in her seat at Payette School District Board of Directors meetings, Superintendent Robin Gilbert continues to keep an eye on matters affecting what is taught in Payette’s classrooms. as well as the classroom spaces themselves. As Gilbert was absent from the regular board meeting on Monday, board chair Andy […]]]>

PAYETTE – Even when she’s not in her seat at Payette School District Board of Directors meetings, Superintendent Robin Gilbert continues to keep an eye on matters affecting what is taught in Payette’s classrooms. as well as the classroom spaces themselves. As Gilbert was absent from the regular board meeting on Monday, board chair Andy Kirkendall delivered his monthly board report for July 2021 in his absence.

Here are examples of work that Gilbert focused on in his report.

Public relations conference

This week Gilbert and Payette High assistant principal Marci Holcomb attended the National Schools Public Relations Association conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. Details on the topics covered were not available at the time of publication.

“This is a valuable resource and event as we address the goals of improving communication in and out of the district,” Gilbert wrote in his report.

Addressing the payment of leadership bonuses under Idaho code 33-1004J (1), Gilbert noted that an additional district-level public relations position should be discussed with school administrators and representatives of the Payette Education Association. .

Approval of the post is pending input from stakeholders, according to the report.

According to the report, district facilities manager Alvin Hall is managing several renovation projects this summer, including renovating the classroom at Presidio Alternative High School to accommodate 8th grade programming classes, new carpet in the classroom. Payette Elementary School, as well as Westside Elementary School and warranty repairs to Payette Elementary Tennis Court. At McCain Middle School, the parking lot has been repaved.

In addition to soliciting bids for the Payette High School cafeteria redevelopment, the boys’ locker room floor was recently refurbished with Gilbert saying it “looks amazing.” Other planned projects include the installation of toilet doors for the locker room and urinal dividers in the boys’ bathroom.

“We are awaiting a quote for a sound system for the dome,” Gilbert noted.

Additionally, Beniton and Hutchison Smith Architects recommended material testing on current facilities before bidding on two projects this week. A guided tour of the bidders is scheduled for Tuesday with an opening of the bids on August 5.

To keep up with changes to district plan requirements as made during Idaho’s 2021 legislative session, Gilbert attended an online webinar to review these changes in preparation for finalizing them in delays.

On Gilbert’s district plan to-do list is the In-Person Safe Return and Continuity of Services plan, which is due on August 2.

“It is a condition for receiving [American Rescue Plan – Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief] fund, ”Gilbert wrote. “I should be able to write it into the template based on our plans and our work last summer and last year.”

Speaking of emergency relief funds, the district fund utilization plan for said funds is due on October 1.

“This plan will be drafted with meaningful consultation with stakeholders, giving [the] the public the opportunity to contribute to the development of the plan.

According to Gilbert, the strategic planning committee organized three community meetings with “very little participation” from the public, “but quality feedback”.

Gilbert wrote that she had received a letter from a client with additional comments and contacted them to follow up. She also noted that those who attended gave the committee the feedback it needed to move forward.

“Strategic planning is behind schedule due to lack of participation, but voice is essential,” she wrote. “The next step is to consolidate the survey results and feedback from community meetings into focus areas, then write the strategic plan and publish it along with the survey to get the final opinion and feedback. ‘stakeholder opinion’.

As Gilbert noted, the state task force on school indoctrination accepted the testimony at its second meeting in late June.

“The controversial debate calls for schools and teachers to adopt curricula and practices with little opportunity to demystify,” Gilbert wrote. “I have visited a representative of the Idaho Education Association on several occasions regarding these issues. National Education Association statements may fuel the fires in Idaho schools, but [the Idaho association] works to support local decision making.

Gilbert said she and the anonymous representative have met with several teachers from Payette to create an action plan ahead of a school year where she expects teachers and schools to be scrutinized.

“The Boise School District is welcoming one of our teachers for training August 11 on how to discuss controversial topics in the classroom. The administrator’s educational guidance and adherence to policies should help our teachers feel secure to teach the approved curriculum with confidence.

The next regular meeting of the Board of Directors will be held on Monday August 9 in the Galleon Room at Presidio, 20 N. 12th St.

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Around Town: Free Soccer Lesson Provides Community Space to Play | New https://gillansinn.com/around-town-free-soccer-lesson-provides-community-space-to-play-new/ Sat, 17 Jul 2021 16:20:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/around-town-free-soccer-lesson-provides-community-space-to-play-new/ SLIDESHOW: Jeffren Peraza, center with a sign, contacting college football teams to help him teach a free football class at Rich May Memorial Field in East Palo Alto on July 10, 2021. Courtesy of Thiebaut Method . Children practice soccer in a free class at Rich May Memorial Field in East Palo Alto on July […]]]>

In the latest Round Town column, news of a third-grader sharing his love for football with the community and Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm’s virtual tour of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory last week.

TO REACH A GOAL… There is nothing quite like the euphoria of playing football, which recently brought professional players to the Euro 2020 tournament which Italy won on July 11. Jeffren Peraza helped bring local sports fans together in East Palo Alto on July 10 for a free football class hosted by Thiebaut method, a non-profit organization that works with low-income youth on projects of social interest.

The event brought together about fifty people Rich May Memorial Field for an afternoon that demonstrated the fundamentals of soccer and the benefits of physical activity. In one video Before the class, Jeffren presented the skills participants would learn in the class, including hitting, kicking, passing and dribbling obstacles. He has also established links with businesses and colleges in the region. Willow football in Menlo Park and Professional football in Redwood City came with donations of equipment. Members of Stanford Women’s Football, San José State University Men’s Football, University Men’s Soccer, The Reikes Center and East Palo Alto United Soccer Club came to help teach the class.

“I did it because (football) is my passion and I love it, and I would like everyone to love it too,” Jeffren said in a post-event video.

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER … the National Laboratory of SLAC Accelerators operated by Stanford University welcomed the energy secretary Jennifer granholm, albeit virtually, on July 8. For two hours on Zoom, she contacted staff and took a look at the research facilities at Menlo Park. Granholm also toured the lab’s Linac coherent light source x-ray laser, toured the Extreme Matter Experimental Station which is used to test high temperatures and pressures in materials, and saw the largest world’s digital camera for astronomy, according to a press release SLAC. Staff also gave presentations on machine learning, quantum technology, and climate science.

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