Event facilities – Gillan's Inn http://gillansinn.com/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 02:31:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gillansinn.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-favicon-2-32x32.png Event facilities – Gillan's Inn http://gillansinn.com/ 32 32 Sarrias Pro Fuels Hall during the final round of the Nittany Lion https://gillansinn.com/sarrias-pro-fuels-hall-during-the-final-round-of-the-nittany-lion/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 22:08:38 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/sarrias-pro-fuels-hall-during-the-final-round-of-the-nittany-lion/ History links STATE COLLEGE, PA. – Second year Ana Sarrias Pro (Cádiz, Spain) shot an even par, 72, in the final round of the Nittany Lion Invitational to lead the Seton Hall women’s golf team to 13e place on arrival Sunday. Sarrias Pro had four birdies and 10 pars […]]]>

STATE COLLEGE, PA. – Second year Ana Sarrias Pro (Cádiz, Spain) shot an even par, 72, in the final round of the Nittany Lion Invitational to lead the Seton Hall women’s golf team to 13e place on arrival Sunday.

Sarrias Pro had four birdies and 10 pars en route to a par, 72, in the third round to tie for 36e place in the set. For the tournament, she was 11 over par with a 79-76-72-227.

As a team, Seton Hall shot an over-par 22, 310, on Sunday. The Pirates finished their second tournament of the year with a 52-over-par, 305-301-310-916. Host Penn State walked away with the tag team title at 3 under par. Seton Hall’s only BIG EAST competition, Butler, finished seventh at 35 over par.

Graduate student Sarah Fouratt (Santa Maria, California) was the best individual pirate in the tournament. On Sunday, she used 14 pars to power a 4-over-par, 76. For the tournament, she tied 32n/a place in the overall standings with a 10 over par, 79-71-76-226.

First-year student Ashni Solanki (Melbourne, Australia) completed his second collegiate tournament with a 9-over-par, 81, in the third round. For the two-day event, she was 17 over par with a 75-77-81-233.

Junior Ginevra Zavagli (Rome, Italy) had a 9-over-par, 81, in the third round. For the tournament, she was 21 over par with a 73-83-81-237.

Senior Ludovica Busetto (Padua, Italy) shot an over-par 13, 85, on Sunday. For the two-day event, she was 24 over par with a 78-77-85-240.

Two Pirates were playing individually in their first collegiate tournaments. Anne-Sophie Ekman (Copenhagen, Denmark) finished with a 27 over par, 84-80-79-243. Lara Todorovic (Belgrade, Serbia) had the best lap of her young career, a 6 over par, 78. She is 31 over par with an 85-84-78-247.

Tournament details:
NITTANY LION INVITATIONAL
Host: Penn State University
Location: State College, Pennsylvania.
Course: Penn State Golf Course (Blue Course)
Vital elements of the course: Par-72, 6,402 yards
Appointment: September 17-18, 2022, three rounds

THE LESSON:

Located in the heart of the rolling terrain of central Pennsylvania, another world of exhilarating golf awaits! A place where carefully designed courses harmonize with the natural beauty of the surroundings. A place that will lead you to complete the challenges of the game you love. Penn State golf courses are ready to bring you the best in the game. Take a spin on our tree-lined fairway and experience the finest course facilities and personalized service. We also offer an award-winning driving range with the Golf Range Association of America since 2012, with four practice greens, a bunker area, and 32 artificial practice ranges with numerous targets on the course.

The relaxing atmosphere continues just off the greens and into the Walker Clubhouse. Within this 6,000 square foot facility you will find a comprehensive golf shop stocked with the latest in quality golf equipment and merchandise. Let our golf professionals share their expertise with you and answer all your questions. Next to the golf shop is the Nineteenth Hole Cafe. This snack area offers a variety of dishes and snacks for a quick bite or a relaxing meal. The cafe’s open dining area overlooks the fairways and perfectly complements a round of golf.

FIELD:

In addition to Seton Hall and host Penn State, the field consisted of 14 other teams, including: Boston College, Bradley, Bucknell, Central Michigan, Columbia, Eastern Kentucky, High Point, Kennesaw State, Navy, Richmond, Toledo , Towson and Youngstown State. Also on the court is BIG EAST opponent Butler.

NEXT:

Seton Hall will return to the tournament next weekend when he plays three rounds of golf at the Princeton Invitational at Springdale Golf Club on September 24-25.





















2022 NITTANY LION INVITATIONAL – Team Scores
pos. Player R1 R2 R3 TOTAL BY
1 Penn State 289 282 290 861 -3
2 Kennesaw State 286 301 290 877 +13
3 Boston College 286 296 296 878 +14
4 Youngstown State 300 294 296 890 +26
5 richmond 304 293 297 894 +30
6 Toledo 294 307 296 897 +33
seven Butler 301 297 301 899 +35
8 Eastern Kentucky 300 297 307 904 +40
9 Marine 304 304 297 905 +41
ten Central Michigan 307 298 301 906 +42
11 Bradley 308 304 299 911 +47
12 Towson 306 303 305 914 +50
13 SETON ROOM 305 301 310 916 +52
14 high point 294 308 315 917 +53
15 Colombia 303 309 308 920 +56
16 Bucknell 307 311 305 923 +59

]]>
BLM Hosts Final Wild Horse Adoption Events for the Year https://gillansinn.com/blm-hosts-final-wild-horse-adoption-events-for-the-year/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 21:41:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/blm-hosts-final-wild-horse-adoption-events-for-the-year/ The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is wrapping up its wild horse adoption events in the coming weeks. It’s almost a year later one of the biggest roundups in the history of the state. The BLM held 32 wild horse adoption events in Wyoming since late April. At the Cheyenne Frontier Days adoption event, 15 […]]]>

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is wrapping up its wild horse adoption events in the coming weeks. It’s almost a year later one of the biggest roundups in the history of the state.

The BLM held 32 wild horse adoption events in Wyoming since late April. At the Cheyenne Frontier Days adoption event, 15 horses and burros were available and all were adopted, according to Azure Hall, the Wyoming BLM public affairs specialist.

Hall said the goal is to find homes for all the animals, but owning them takes work.

“The amount of training they need is definitely something people need to consider,” she said. “You’re not just buying decoration for a farm, because they’re originally wild animals.”

The BLM rounded up more than 4,000 wild horses last winter in southwest Wyoming, making it one of their biggest roundups yet. However, Hall said that didn’t affect the number of adoption events this year.

“Most of the facilities we work with that adopt our BLM horses already have their schedule set for the year, regardless of roundups,” Hall said.

In August there was more than 4,000 horsepower in the state who have not been adopted and remain in holding facilities, which may include corrals, pastures and training facilities. Wyoming has two wild horse training facilities at Mantle Ranch and Riverton Jail.

The final three adoption events will take place at the Mantle Ranch in Wheatland on September 17 and at the Wheatland Off Range Corral on October 7 and 21. In addition, horses are available for adoption. on line. Hall added that feral horses are usually offered for adoption three times before they go permanently to long-term facilities or eco-sanctuaries.

Hall said there will likely be another wild horse roundup before the end of the year.

]]>
Green Communities event in Waco focuses on climate risks and solutions | Local government and politics https://gillansinn.com/green-communities-event-in-waco-focuses-on-climate-risks-and-solutions-local-government-and-politics/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 01:57:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/green-communities-event-in-waco-focuses-on-climate-risks-and-solutions-local-government-and-politics/ A warming planet is poised to bring sweltering summers to Waco over the next decade or two while devastating coral reefs, melting the planet’s ice and causing flooding. oceans in coastal cities, attendees of Waco’s first-ever Green Communities Symposium said Wednesday. The good news, according to City of Waco and private sector stakeholders, is that […]]]>

A warming planet is poised to bring sweltering summers to Waco over the next decade or two while devastating coral reefs, melting the planet’s ice and causing flooding. oceans in coastal cities, attendees of Waco’s first-ever Green Communities Symposium said Wednesday.

The good news, according to City of Waco and private sector stakeholders, is that Waco has immediate opportunities to reduce its carbon footprint without breaking the bank.

Opportunities include new sources of federal funding that could fund solar projects on city property, improve energy conservation and build green transportation projects, officials said.






Waco resident DeShauna Hollie posts her message on the window as attendees were invited to the Green Communities event, hosted by Keep Waco Beautiful.


Jerry Larson, Tribune-Herald


Some 200 people came to the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative for the day-long event hosted by Keep Waco Beautiful and sponsored by Lush Cosmetics, the city and Baylor University.

People also read…

The 14 sessions included insights from Baylor scientists, City of Waco department heads, food and water and land use experts, an electric vehicle advocate, and local factory managers operated by Amazon, Mars Inc. and Balcones Distilling.

Attendees included Waco City Council members Jim Holmes and Kelly Palmer.

“There’s a level of excitement that we call that climate change is real and that we’re facing an existential crisis, with a particular effect on communities of color,” Palmer said during a panel discussion. afternoon she hosted with leaders of non-profit organizations.

She said that when she talks to students at local schools, they want to know what the city is doing to fight climate change.







sustainability

Attendees listen to speakers at the Green Communities event, hosted by Keep Waco Beautiful at the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative.


Jerry Larson, Tribune-Herald


Officials outlined new federal funding opportunities the city could pursue that could make financial and environmental sense.

The Cut Inflation Act passed last month was the most ambitious climate legislation in history, with $391.7 billion in incentives to cut carbon emissions. This includes energy efficiency funding and a solar grant of up to 40% that is now available to local governments and nonprofits.

Centrica Business Solutions is conducting a preliminary study for a City of Waco energy efficiency initiative that would target heating and cooling in city facilities as well as LED lighting conversion, water conservation and solar and battery installations.

Brian Burcham, a Centrica representative, said the company is considering community centers, which are used as emergency heating and cooling stations during extreme weather conditions. The city could install rooftop solar panels that could recharge the batteries during times when regular electric service is down.

That would be in addition to diesel generators, said Eric Coffman, the city’s sustainability programs manager. He said community centers would be designated as “resilience hubs” for the city.

Meanwhile, the city is also studying the feasibility of installing solar panels at the Waco Regional Landfill when it closes in a few years and using its methane gas for electricity.

Waco Metropolitan Planning Organization Director Mukesh Kumar told attendees that additional funds are being made available to communities for carbon-reduction transportation projects under the Federal Investment and Investment Act. employment in infrastructure adopted last year.

Kumar said DFO expects to receive nearly $550,000 a year over the next five years for projects such as pedestrian improvements, streetlight changes and public transit.

He said $500,000 wouldn’t normally fund a single mile of sidewalk, so the money must be spent wisely and with a view to helping areas of “persistent poverty.”

He said he was happy to see the conference promoting electric vehicles, but he said less reliance on cars is the real goal, to be achieved through more walkable communities and public transportation.

“Every car drop that happens at school has a carbon footprint,” Kumar said. “Walking is the best way to get there. … We have emphasized single-passenger vehicles, but public transport inevitably and in all cases reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

“I know individual decision-making and technology is an attractive way to see how we can get out of this mess, but without changing the system itself, … I highly doubt we can make a difference.”

Baylor environmental scientist Sascha Usenko highlighted the dangers of climate change in an hour-long primer in which he detailed accelerating trends in carbon dioxide levels and global temperature over the past of the last 50 years.

“The worst thing about this conversation is a lot of bad news,” he said.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported a spike of 421 parts per million in atmospheric carbon dioxide at its Mauna Loa Observatory in May, a level not seen in 4 million years. CO2 concentrations have increased by about 27% over the past 50 years, according to NOAA data.

Climate scientists have warned the Earth will reach a tipping point if its average temperature rises 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, which could happen by 2040, Usenko said.

At this point, 70% of coral reefs will disappear, which will spell disaster for fishing, and extreme heat waves will quadruple in frequency, he said. The collapse of an area of ​​Antarctic ice the size of Florida could occur in the next few years, causing sea levels to rise by a foot, flooding coastal cities.

But Usenko said the worst effects could be avoided if countries and communities committed to reducing carbon emissions.

He said Texas is known as an oil state, but it’s also the No. 1 in wind and No. 2 in solar, and renewables make up 34% of the state’s power grid as of today. first quarter of this year.

“Waco is growing and now is the time for sustainability,” he said. “When you think of the climate, it’s the cities and local communities that are responsible for it. This conference is a step forward.

Charles Dowdell, director of sustainability for the city of Waco, told Usenko that his speech was powerful medicine.

“It’s a wake-up call to see how Earth is affected by changes in CO2 levels,” Dowdell said.

Keep Waco Beautiful executive director Carole Fergusson said the second Green Communities event is already planned for next year.

“Today was amazing,” Fergusson said. “People felt inspired, energized and hopeful.”

She said Lake Waco’s water restrictions this year and food shortages at grocery stores show how the environment cannot be taken for granted.

“I hope this can be the catalyst for change in the community and inspire city leaders to take action,” Fergusson said.

]]>
Schuylkill County Nursing Home Employees Receive Raise Under Facility Agreements | Company https://gillansinn.com/schuylkill-county-nursing-home-employees-receive-raise-under-facility-agreements-company/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/schuylkill-county-nursing-home-employees-receive-raise-under-facility-agreements-company/ Workers at two Schuylkill County nursing homes will receive more money under contracts with their employers. Under the three-year pacts, employees represented by SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania at The Gardens at York Terrace in Pottsville and Ridgeview Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center in Shenandoah Heights will receive raises of more than $3 per hour, with the raises […]]]>

Workers at two Schuylkill County nursing homes will receive more money under contracts with their employers.

Under the three-year pacts, employees represented by SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania at The Gardens at York Terrace in Pottsville and Ridgeview Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center in Shenandoah Heights will receive raises of more than $3 per hour, with the raises increasing by 9% in the first year of the contract and 18% during the contract. The lowest paid workers will get raises of more than 40%, according to the union, which released details of the contract on Monday.

The starting wage will be $14.50 an hour, compared to $10.50 an hour, according to the union, for some employees. The contract also includes increases for longevity.

The SEIU announced Friday that it has reached an agreement with Priority Healthcare, the parent company of The Gardens at York Terrace, and Comprehensive Healthcare. On Saturday, the union said a settlement had been reached with Ridgeview’s parent company, Shenandoah Heights Healthcare LLC.

The new contracts, which have been ratified by the union, put an end to the strikes in the establishments which began on September 2. Those for Guardian and Priority Healthcare are retroactive to July 1, while those for Ridgeview employees took effect September 1.

The strike involved 12 care homes and 700 workers, according to SEIU officials.

Staffing, health insurance needs met

In addition to the increases, workers will receive health insurance adjustments to make costs more affordable and allow more providers into the network, as well as a commitment to ensure safe staffing levels and maintain the contract in the event. of sale.

Ridgeview workers received paid time off, having already used personal time to go on vacation, according to the SEIU.

Before going on strike, the employees had demanded substantial wage increases for all existing employees; employer-paid health insurance; protection of the existing contract in the event of sale; ensuring that employers comply with new state regulations governing staffing; and written pledges not to interfere with the rights of workers who choose to form their unions to hold private equity firms and nefarious retirement home chains to account.

“These workers have been relentless advocates for their residents, providing care in conditions most of us cannot even imagine,” SEIU Healthcare Pennsylvania President Matthew Yarnell said in a statement. “There is a national trend of for-profit nursing home operators using taxpayer dollars to meet the demands of their investors. This strike was to force nursing home operators to invest in our work and care for Pennsylvania residents. »

David Jasinski, an attorney representing the two Schuylkill County retirement homes, said he’s glad the contracts have been settled and looks forward to continuing to work with the union.

“We seek to provide the best services to residents,” he said.

]]>
Tech Golfers through 9th at Maui Jim Intercollegiate – Men’s Golf – Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets https://gillansinn.com/tech-golfers-through-9th-at-maui-jim-intercollegiate-mens-golf-georgia-tech-yellow-jackets/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 01:51:11 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/tech-golfers-through-9th-at-maui-jim-intercollegiate-mens-golf-georgia-tech-yellow-jackets/ Scottsdale, Ariz. – Bartley Forrester shot a 7 under par 63 on Saturday, and Connor Howe added a 3-under 67, allowing No. ¾ Georgia Tech to post a 13-under 267 round and move up two spots to ninth after 36 holes at the Maui Jim Intercollegiate. Meanwhile, freshman Hiroshi Tai went 12-under in the 36-hole […]]]>

Scottsdale, Ariz. Bartley Forrester shot a 7 under par 63 on Saturday, and Connor Howe added a 3-under 67, allowing No. ¾ Georgia Tech to post a 13-under 267 round and move up two spots to ninth after 36 holes at the Maui Jim Intercollegiate.

Meanwhile, freshman Hiroshi Tai went 12-under in the 36-hole final of the Individual Tournament at Desert Mountain and earned his first win in a collegiate playoff tournament against Arizona State’s Michael Mjaaseth.

After struggling on the front nine Friday at the 7,118-yard, par-70 Mirabel Golf Club, the Yellow Jackets scored 10-under Saturday on the same nine holes, which was their closing nine for Round 2. They passed New Mexico and Wake Forest in the standings and sat 16 strokes behind Auburn, which leads the team race by two over Arizona State.

Tech, which won this event last September at 44 under par, will begin its final round of the 54-hole tournament at 11:40 a.m. ET on Sunday.

TECHNICAL RANGE – With four birdies and a bogey on his front nine and four birdies and no bogey on his back nine, Forrester tied his career low round, which was posted at Mirabel in the third round of this event a year ago, and tied for the low round of the day. The eldest from Gainesville, Georgia, went tied for 20e place at 5 under par 135. Howe also played the bogey second nine for free for his 67 and completed 36 holes at 8 under par 132, tied for ninth place individually.

Ross Steelmanadded a 1 under par 69 on Saturday to his opening 66 and is also tied for 20e place at 5 under par 135. Tech also scored a 2 under par 68 in the first year Aidan Tranand junior Christo Lamprecht shot 1 under par 69.

Hiroshi Tai shot 12-under in Saturday’s 36-hole singles final at Desert Mountain to win the tournament in the playoffs. (photo by Mike Holmes)

EVENT SUMMARY BY TEAM –Auburn maintained their lead by posting a 268 12-under on Saturday, but saw it shrink to just two strokes after Arizona State shot 23-under 257. The Tigers have a 36-under total holes of 526 (-34), while the Sun Devils finished the second round at 528 (-32).

Florida State shot 19 under on Saturday and sits in third place at 531 (-29), followed by Tennessee (533, -27) in fourth. San Diego State and Oregon are tied for fifth at 538 (-22). Washington (540, -20), Arizona (541, -19), Georgia Tech (542, -18) and New Mexico (546, -14) round out the top 10 of 18 teams.

With a 63, Caleb Surratt of Tennessee took the lead in the individual standings at 13 under par 127, one stroke ahead of Owen Avril of Oregon (128, -12). Florida State’s Cole Anderson, with a 64 on Saturday, is tied for third with Auburn’s Ryan Eshleman at 11-under 129. Eshleman followed his first-round 60 with a 69. Shea Lague of the San Diego State and Wake Forest’s Boyd Owens are tied for fifth at 130 (-10).

INDIVIDUAL EVENT SUMMARY – Georgia Tech’s Tai shot 68-66 rounds on Saturday and finished the individual event on the Desert Mountain Outlaw course tied with Arizona State’s Mjaaseth at 14-under 202. The Yellow Jacket rookie walked away with his first collegiate victory with a birdie on the first hole of the playoffs and outlasted 36 other players for the triumph.

TOURNAMENT INFORMATION – The Yellow Jackets are participating in the Maui Jim Intercollegiate for the fifth time, having won the tournament in 2018 and 2021 after finishing sixth and second the previous two years. Georgia State hosts the 18-team event, which is 54 holes ending Sunday. The team event takes place at Mirabel Golf Club, a 7,118-yard, par-70 course in Scottsdale, Arizona, in the same vicinity as Grayhawk Golf Club, site of the NCAA championship last spring and during each of the next two years. .

A 54-hole companion event for those not in their team’s starting lineup is held concurrently at the Outlaw course at Desert Mountain. Three Tech players took part in the individual competition, which ended on Saturday.

Participating teams include Arizona, Arizona State, Auburn, Clemson, East Tennessee State, Florida State, Georgia State, Georgia Tech, Louisville, New Mexico, NC State, Oregon, San Diego State, Tennessee, UCLA, UNLV, Washington and Wake Forest . Georgia Tech (3), Arizona State (5), Tennessee (10), Florida State (11), Wake Forest (24), Oregon (26), East Tennessee State (27) and Washington (30) are all listed among Golf the chain’s top 30 pre-season teams.

Alexandre-Tharpe Fund

The Alexander-Tharpe Fund is the fundraising arm of Georgia Tech Athletics, providing scholarships, operations, and facilities support for over 400 Georgia Tech student-athletes. Help develop Georgia Tech’s Daily Champions and help the Yellow Jackets compete for championships at the highest level of college athletics by supporting the Annual Athletic Scholarship Fund, which provides scholarships directly to Georgia Tech student-athletes. To learn more about supporting the Yellow Vests, visit atfund.org.

ABOUT GEORGIA TECH GOLF

Georgia Tech’s golf team is in its 28the year under head coach Bruce Heppler, winning 70 tournaments during his tenure. The Yellow Jackets have won 18 Atlantic Coast Conference championships, made 31 NCAA championship appearances, and been national runners-up four times. Connect with Georgia Tech Golf on social media by liking their Facebook page or following on Twitter (@GTGolf) and Instagram. For more information on Golf Tech, visit Ramblinwreck.com.

]]>
TCU Facilities Keep the Campus Grounds Beautiful…Through Drought and Storm https://gillansinn.com/tcu-facilities-keep-the-campus-grounds-beautifulthrough-drought-and-storm/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 16:46:52 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/tcu-facilities-keep-the-campus-grounds-beautifulthrough-drought-and-storm/ The scorching heat and record high temperatures this summer have left North Texas yards and flower beds struggling to survive. But at TCU, the landscaping and grounds team has kept the campus green and healthy, through skillful soil and irrigation management — and lots of planning. “We only water when the city’s watering schedule permits, […]]]>

The scorching heat and record high temperatures this summer have left North Texas yards and flower beds struggling to survive. But at TCU, the landscaping and grounds team has kept the campus green and healthy, through skillful soil and irrigation management — and lots of planning.

“We only water when the city’s watering schedule permits, which is twice a week,” said Erik Trevino, manager. “We water deeply on those days, and the grass and plants we have are trained to survive on that.”

As well as planning the right types of grass planted based on conditions – primarily based on sun exposure but also the level of foot traffic – the team constantly monitors the weather.

“Every day we talk about the weather so we can determine water settings and actively manage the sprinklers so we don’t run them in the rain.”

While rain delays weren’t an issue this summer, drought was. Trevino attributed the current verdant conditions to past selections of hardy plants and grasses that have now established root systems. He also credited the team of 50 who maintain the acreage for their expertise, particularly with the delicate balance of watering – not enough and lawns can quickly turn brown, too much leads to disease.

“We have a long-standing field team that keeps our campus in good shape,” Trevino said. “It’s not just about pushing a mower. We are passionate about the terrain being something for everyone, including those in the community who drive through it and through it.

One of the most distinctive green spaces on campus is the tree canopy on University Drive. Trevino, a certified arborist, said crews only prune trees on campus as needed, for safety and aesthetic reasons. There are approximately 3,200 trees on over 300 acres of TCU and a variety of species. This diversity is important to guard against a disease that wipes out large numbers of people.

“Trees are one of our most important assets, and mature trees cannot be replaced,” he added. “They create shade to cool off and encourage students to walk instead of drive.”

Whether walking or driving along TCU’s main streets, students and others frequently comment on the beautifully manicured flowerbeds. These change with the seasons and although they are among the most pampered plants on campus, their showy display of purple and white explains why they are found in prestigious locations.

As water becomes an increasingly scarce resource, Trevino seeks to include more adaptive plants in the landscape. He also encourages the team to take cuttings from existing plants to grow in the university’s greenhouse for future landscaping.

Other sustainability practices include separating green waste for composting and using organic fertilizers. Future plans are to incorporate more drip irrigation systems as well as establish plants that attract pollinators.

The campus sustainability committee, made up of students, shares ideas with Trevino and his team. One of their annual events is Texas Arbor Day, which takes place on the first Friday of November.

“We will have tree planting and educational opportunities,” Trevino noted of this year’s event, which is part of TCU’s multi-year certification as Tree Campus USA. An audio-guided campus tree tour is also available on the TCU website.

“Student engagement is important. When you connect with nature, you find harmony. A peaceful environment is an environment in which we can all thrive.

]]>
Grand Rapids Public Schools Seeks Community Feedback on New Facilities Plan https://gillansinn.com/grand-rapids-public-schools-seeks-community-feedback-on-new-facilities-plan/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 00:53:47 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/grand-rapids-public-schools-seeks-community-feedback-on-new-facilities-plan/ GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — Grand Rapids Public Schools is considering new ways to use underutilized buildings, a project the public is invited to weigh in on. From September 13 to October 12, the GRPS will host eleven public meetings, all open to the public. Community members are invited to share their thoughts on the new […]]]>

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. — Grand Rapids Public Schools is considering new ways to use underutilized buildings, a project the public is invited to weigh in on.

From September 13 to October 12, the GRPS will host eleven public meetings, all open to the public. Community members are invited to share their thoughts on the new facilities plan and engage with district leaders.

The facilities master plan will allow the school system to optimize financial resources, says GRPS, since the space they currently have is more than their student body needs.

READ MORE: Grand Rapids Public Schools seek to combat declining enrollment by ‘revitalizing’ buildings

The school stresses the importance of the facilities master plan, saying that if the number of school buildings is reduced, the school will be better able to channel taxpayer dollars into programs that benefit GRPS students.

“These are serious conversations that require input from the community as a whole. The decisions we make with this facilities master plan will enhance the education of our scholars today and in the future,” said GRPS Superintendent Dr. Leadriane Roby. “This plan needs all hands on deck and this public engagement plan reflects our desire to have as many voices as possible around the table.”

At each event, GRPS will provide childcare services for those in need, as well as refreshments for all attendees.

In addition, GRPS emphasizes that interpretation services will be available at all meetings. Two of the town hall dates will include a “dedicated Spanish session”, running concurrently with the English session.

For those unable to attend in person, GRPS also offers access via Zoom.

Additionally, GRPS is releasing a community survey for additional feedback on the facilities master plan.

Comments can also be submitted to myschools@grps.org

Follow FOX 17: Facebook – Twitter -Instagram-YouTube

]]>
Cumberland board to review ‘guiding principles’ for Crown Event Center project https://gillansinn.com/cumberland-board-to-review-guiding-principles-for-crown-event-center-project/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/cumberland-board-to-review-guiding-principles-for-crown-event-center-project/ By Jason Brady The Cumberland County Board of Commissioners is due to consider two issues related to the Crown Event Center project on Tuesday. The Board will consider approving the “Guiding Principles” which have been approved by the Crown Event Center Committee. Approval of the Request for Qualifications for architectural services for the project will […]]]>

By Jason Brady

The Cumberland County Board of Commissioners is due to consider two issues related to the Crown Event Center project on Tuesday.

The Board will consider approving the “Guiding Principles” which have been approved by the Crown Event Center Committee. Approval of the Request for Qualifications for architectural services for the project will also be requested.

Council meets at 9 a.m. in Room 118 of the Judge E. Maurice Braswell Cumberland County Courthouse.

The Crown Event Center committee is made up of commissioners Jeannette Council, Jimmy Keefe and Glenn Adams. At a committee meeting on August 16, members received an update on the center from MBP Carolinas, who serves as the “owner’s representative” for the project.

Earlier this year, County Executive Amy Cannon told commissioners that having a landlords’ representative would make the process of building the center faster and more efficient.

The proposed facility will replace the aging theater and arena at the Crown Coliseum complex on US 301 Business. Both facilities are scheduled to close in 2025.

At the August meeting, MBP presented the “Guiding Principles” which are intended to serve as the basis for the development of the Crown Event Center. Essentially, these are project-specific values ​​based on recommendations from a community engagement process.

The guiding principles were first presented to the committee in May and were refined and revised based on a community engagement process held July 15-16.

The Crown Event Center committee approved the revised guiding principles at its August 16 meeting. Also at the meeting, the committee asked MBP to prepare a request for qualifications for architectural services for the full board to consider.

The guiding principles approved by the committee require several things, including:

  • A local and regional asset that builds on existing economic development infrastructure and is a catalyst for existing and new businesses to flourish.
  • A place that enhances and elevates the community as a premier destination for entertainment, events and gatherings.
  • A quality, scalable and efficient venue that delivers a first-class experience with a lasting impression.
  • A place that offers a first-class, welcoming and accessible experience for all customers.
  • A flexible and functional place with several spaces to accommodate a varied program.
  • Affordable spaces to host local and regional cultural programs hosted by schools, universities, arts organizations and community organizations.
  • An engaging community facility that is financially self-sufficient.

County staff recommends that council approve the guidelines and price request for architectural services.

In other matters, County Health Director Jennifer Green is to give the council a detailed briefing on monkeypox and the county’s response to the disease. Free vaccines and tests are available at the Department of Public Health.

Currently, there are nine cases of monkeypox in Cumberland County, according to a memo in the council’s agenda.

Statewide, there are 332 cases of monkeypox with the following demographics:

  • 99% of all cases involve men who have sex with men.
  • 37% among 18-29 year olds.
  • 54% among 30-49 year olds.
  • 68% among African American men.
  • 87% are non-Hispanic.

The board must also meet in camera for real estate acquisition, attorney-client matters and personnel.

Jason Brady covers Cumberland County Government for CityView TODAY. He can be reached at jbrady@cityviewnc.com.

]]>
The basin sports complex ignites sports for young people and adults https://gillansinn.com/the-basin-sports-complex-ignites-sports-for-young-people-and-adults/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 20:47:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/the-basin-sports-complex-ignites-sports-for-young-people-and-adults/ Complex strengthens community health and economic vitality ODESSA, TX, September 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Basin Sports Complexdirected by Sports Equipment Companies (SFC), has done several renovations to fields and facilities since December 2021. Over the past nine months, there have been more than 600 rentals at the 12 ball diamonds and three football fields, […]]]>

Complex strengthens community health and economic vitality

ODESSA, TX, September 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The Basin Sports Complexdirected by Sports Equipment Companies (SFC), has done several renovations to fields and facilities since December 2021. Over the past nine months, there have been more than 600 rentals at the 12 ball diamonds and three football fields, with around 12,000 people passing through the park for practices and games. The Basin Sports Complex has partnered with the Girls Youth Fast Pitch Association to offer a short season league with 33 teams and 400 participants, drawing approximately 14,000 spectators throughout the 28 games.

With community demand for youth and adult sports in the Odessa booming area, the complex is preparing to host various activities, leagues and tournaments in the coming months. The Basin BBQ, District 2-6A Cross Country Championships, and the Texas Amateurs Athletic Federation (TAAF) State Flag Football Championship are just a few of the exciting events the community can attend. expect this fall at The Basin Sports Complex.

During the month of August, The Basin offered adult softball to OdessaMidland community, with 24 teams playing on Sunday evenings, with an average of 250 players and 400 spectators per night. Additionally, in August, the Back to the Basin Tournament Festival featured 36 youth baseball teams, nine youth girls’ fastpitch teams, 16 adult softball teams and eight adult flag football teams competing in tournaments. . This event drew over 2,000 participants to the area, including baseball teams from Lubbock and El Paso.

“Seeing the community come together and cheer on all these players lets me know that all the hard work put into revamping the resort and bringing the sport back to this area is paying off,” said The Basin general manager. Andy Cedillo. “That’s why I came to run this complex. Improving the health and economic vitality of our community is our number one priority. We will continue to work even harder to bring more events, tournaments and leagues to our residents and neighbors,” he added.

The spring schedule is also filling up with more leagues and tournaments, with plans to host 20 tournaments in baseball, softball, girls rapid softball, flag football and soccer. The complex is estimated to host 1,000 teams and welcomes around 27,000 people to watch the games. This will have an economic impact of more than $8,775,000 and more than 9,100 overnight stays Odessa area in 2023.

The sports facilities, located at the northeast corner of Loop 338, serve the OdessaMidland community by providing sports fields for youth and adult recreation teams. The complex has become a tournament destination for the west Texas and provides opportunities for the community to play baseball, softball, girls’ fast pitch, softball and football; pavilions are available for birthdays and events.

For event booking, contact Andy Cedillo at [email protected]. For updates on the progress of the project, please visit playthebasin.com.

About the Basin Sports Complex

The Basin Sports Complex is a member of the SF Network, the nation’s largest and fastest growing sports facility network, and is operated by industry leader in outsourced operations, sports facility companies, and located at University of Texas Permian Basin patterns in Odessa, Texas, making it a great place for surrounding Permian Basin communities to come together and host sporting events while sharing their love for sports. The sports complex can host soccer, baseball, softball, tennis, tee-ball, basketball, volleyball and different community events programs, events and tournaments in their clubhouses for rent.

press contact

Andy Cedillo
3253740372
https://playthebasin.com/

SOURCE The Basin Sports Complex

]]>
Amazon took solar rooftops offline last year after fires and explosions https://gillansinn.com/amazon-took-solar-rooftops-offline-last-year-after-fires-and-explosions/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 16:10:06 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/amazon-took-solar-rooftops-offline-last-year-after-fires-and-explosions/ Amazon shut down solar power systems at all of its US facilities in 2021 after a series of fires and explosions, including one at its Fresno warehouse in 2020. Fresno Fire Department On the afternoon of April 14, 2020, dozens of firefighters arrived at an Amazon warehouse in Fresno, California, as thick plumes of smoke […]]]>

Amazon shut down solar power systems at all of its US facilities in 2021 after a series of fires and explosions, including one at its Fresno warehouse in 2020.

Fresno Fire Department

On the afternoon of April 14, 2020, dozens of firefighters arrived at an Amazon warehouse in Fresno, California, as thick plumes of smoke poured from the roof of the 880,000 square foot warehouse. .

Some 220 solar panels and other equipment at the facility, known as FAT1, were damaged in the three-alarm fire, which was caused by “an undetermined electrical event in the rooftop-mounted solar system”, Leland Wilding, the Fresno fire investigator, wrote in an incident report.

Just over a year later, about 60 firefighters were called to an even larger Amazon facility in Perryville, Maryland, to put out a two-alarm blaze, local media reported.

In the months that followed, at least four more Amazon fulfillment centers caught fire or suffered electrical explosions due to outages in their solar power generation systems, according to internal company documents seen by CNBC.

The documents, which have never been made public, say that between April 2020 and June 2021, Amazon experienced “critical fires or arc flashes” at at least six of its 47 North American locations with solar installations, affecting 12.7% of these installations. Electric arcs are a kind of electrical explosion.

“The dangerous incident rate is unacceptable and above industry averages,” an Amazon employee wrote in one of the internal reports.

The solar snafus underscores the challenge that Amazon and many other large companies face in their quest to reduce their environmental footprint and lessen their dependence on fossil fuels. Amazon has been among the most aggressive. In 2019, founder Jeff Bezos launched the Climate Pledge, promising that the largest online retailer would eliminate emissions by 2040, embrace renewable energy and move away from gas-guzzling delivery vans, including through an investment of more of a billion dollars in the electric vehicle company Rivian. .

Amazon’s learning curve with solar

US companies are under pressure from regulators and a growing subset of investors to set and report on environmental, social and governance (ESG) goals.

Many will be able to reap financial rewards for renewable energy efforts after Congress passed the Cut Inflation Act in August, which includes climate provisions that are expected to cut the country’s carbon emissions by about 40% by 2030.

Commercial solar power in the United States is expected to grow 8% annually over the next five years, thanks in part to legislation, according to Wood Mackenzie solar analyst Michelle Davis. Warehouses can take advantage of solar power, she said, because they have large roofs and the systems can power all the HVAC, refrigeration and other large energy consumers inside.

But costly and dangerous problems can arise.

Solar power systems on the roof of Amazon’s Fresno warehouse sparked a three-alarm fire in 2020.

Fresno Fire Department

In June last year, all of Amazon’s U.S. operations with solar power had to be temporarily taken offline, according to internal documents. The company needed to ensure that its systems were designed, installed and maintained correctly before “reactivating” any of them.

Amazon spokeswoman Erika Howard told CNBC in a statement that the incidents involved partner-operated systems and that the company responded by voluntarily turning off its solar-powered rooftops.

“Out of an abundance of caution, following a small number of isolated incidents with on-site solar systems owned and operated by third parties, Amazon has proactively shut down our on-site solar installations in North America and taken immediate action. to re-inspect each installation by a leading company of solar technical experts,” the statement read.

These details did not appear in Amazon’s 100-page sustainability report for 2021, which was released in early August. In the report, publicly available via Amazon’s sustainability website, the company said rooftop solar was powering 115 of its fulfillment centers worldwide by the end of 2021, compared to over 90 by mid-year. The majority of them are outside the United States

“Many of our order fulfillment facilities in the US, Europe and India are powered by on-site solar energy, where a rooftop installation can power up to 80% of the plant’s energy consumption. ‘installation,’ the report says.

As of April this year, Amazon had on-site solar power at 176 facilities, according to its website. The solar program was launched in 2017.

“As the inspections are completed, our on-site solar systems are being powered back up,” Howard said. “Amazon has also assembled a team of dedicated solar experts overseeing the construction, operation and maintenance of our systems internally to ensure the safety of our systems.”

Any mention of expenses incurred by Amazon in the event of default is excluded from the public sustainability report. One Amazon employee estimated, in internally released documents, that each incident cost the company an average of $2.7 million. Costs included third-party audits of the rooftop solar systems, verification of how much electricity they produced, and repairs for any broken or faulty parts of the systems identified by inspectors.

The Amazon employee also said the company would lose $940,000 a month, or $20,000 for each of the 47 North American sites downgraded, as long as solar power remained offline. There could be additional costs for Amazon depending on contracts with clean energy partners for renewable energy credits, according to the documents.

To date, Amazon has contracted with third-party vendors to design and then install rooftop solar PV systems and large onsite battery backups. other great retailers, including Walmart and Target, have also installed solar roofs and adopted programs to lower their energy bills and meet sustainability goals.

In addition to its warehouses, Amazon has solar rooftop systems in its Whole Foods stores. Amazon and its auditor, Clean Energy Associates (CEA), have postponed inspections of rooftop solar systems at Whole Foods sites until 2022, the documents show. At the end of 2021, four years after the acquisition of Whole Foods, Amazon was still working to obtain technical information on renewable energy assets in stores.

Solar panels are installed on the roof of a Walmart store in California.

walmart

To maintain tighter quality control of its solar power systems, some Amazon employees have recommended integrating more operations in-house. The Perryville, Maryland fire, which was the sixth failure in just over a year, prompted the company to take systematic action.

On June 17, 2021, about a week after the warehouse fire known as MDT2, Amazon’s sustainability division ordered owners and developers of rooftop solar systems in its US warehouses to put them on. out of order. Solar rooftops would no longer generate electricity from the sun or produce renewable energy credits.

Amazon then engaged the Denver-based CEA to perform a third-party audit of its rooftop solar systems in the United States, Asia-Pacific and Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

Late last year, while the CEA was still conducting its inspections, it notified Amazon of one critical finding and 259 major findings in Amazon’s rooftop solar portfolio. The issues included incompatible module-to-module connectors, improper installation of connectors, poor cable management and evidence of water intrusion into the inverters, according to internal documents.

Problems with inverters, which convert solar power into usable electricity, have been identified as the likely cause of a fire in at least one Amazon warehouse. Wilding, the Fresno fire inspector, concluded that the FAT1 fire “originated on or near two inverters,” according to an investigative report obtained by CNBC via a public records request.

Malfunctions and incorrect installations

Amazon blamed third-party partners and vendors for the most significant issues uncovered by CEA and other teams working on facilities and sustainability initiatives.

“Over the past five years, solar malfunctions have been caused by improper installation techniques, improper commissioning of a new system, improper system maintenance and equipment malfunction,” the documents say. .

Amazon teams working on facilities and sustainability initiatives have devised a two-part plan to help prevent future outages in the rooftop solar program.

In late 2021, the divisions requested $3.6 million in funding to re-inspect sites where major finds were identified to ensure systems could be safely brought back online, according to internal correspondence.

Internal teams have also begun to urge Amazon management to rely more on salaried employees and less on external vendors. Over time, the company has hired more solar experts specializing in sourcing, designing, building and maintaining globally.

In some cases, management has been particularly slow to respond. For example, groups inside the company advocating for change went to management to approval of hiring, re-inspection and re-invigoration plans. But efforts have been delayed for months by top Amazon executives, including Kara Hurst, vice president of global sustainability, and Alicia Boler-Davis, senior vice president of global customer satisfaction, who left the company. company in June 2022, according to internal correspondence consulted. by CNBC.

The job postings suggest that Amazon is still looking to hire people internally for solar operations.

The company was recently looking for someone to manage sustainability projects at its North American facilities, which include rooftop solar. There is a current roster of a technical program partner on the solar team which indicates that a key aspect of the position is working with “internal partners” in global design, solar construction and sustainability, among others divisions.

As it tries to recruit staff, Amazon acknowledged that going green comes with hurdles, especially for a company “of the size and vast reach of Amazon.”

“But at Amazon, we’re not shy about taking on big challenges,” Hurst wrote in the launch letter for the 2021 Sustainability Report. “We don’t have all the answers today, but we believe in the need to act now.”

LOOK: How Two Friends Formed America’s First Amazon Syndicate and What’s Next

]]>