Food and lodging – Gillan's Inn http://gillansinn.com/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 10:20:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gillansinn.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-favicon-2-32x32.png Food and lodging – Gillan's Inn http://gillansinn.com/ 32 32 Empty savings = empty carts – The Suburban Times https://gillansinn.com/empty-savings-empty-carts-the-suburban-times/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 00:08:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/empty-savings-empty-carts-the-suburban-times/ The newspaper rants didn’t work, so maybe an empty basket will. I have seen complaints about using digital coupons for some time. . . and I thought about it even longer. The newspaper rants didn’t work, so maybe an empty basket will. Here is a commentary from the Seattle Times (September 15, 2022 edition) “RANT […]]]>
The newspaper rants didn’t work, so maybe an empty basket will.

I have seen complaints about using digital coupons for some time. . . and I thought about it even longer. The newspaper rants didn’t work, so maybe an empty basket will.

Here is a commentary from the Seattle Times (September 15, 2022 edition)

College Funding Project

“RANT to the Attorney General’s office for allowing grocery stores to require digital coupons for items on sale. This discriminates against buyers who do not own a smartphone or who do not have access to a computer. Some shoppers are disabled and cannot go separately to a library to use a computer for the purpose of picking up the digital coupon. »

This complaint has been made numerous times in the Seattle Times. As a long time Safeway customer, I find the digital coupon virtually useless even though we belong to the Safeway Savings Club. We have been members and get discounts on other products at Safeway, but if I don’t have my reading glasses in my pocket, I can’t get the discount on their digital coupon offers, so we completely lose the savings. So I shop elsewhere when I can.

I feel left out and get a little pissed off about it. Can’t wait for “WinCo” to open on Sixth Avenue (supposedly in December). It means driving a bit further, but if I can get the same food at lower prices, I will. Safeway should try to keep its members, not hunt them.

Tacoma Community College

What are your thoughts?

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Catherine Toth Fox: Buy more locally grown foods. Worth the extra cost https://gillansinn.com/catherine-toth-fox-buy-more-locally-grown-foods-worth-the-extra-cost/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 10:16:18 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/catherine-toth-fox-buy-more-locally-grown-foods-worth-the-extra-cost/ Mainland visitors are willing to pay more for local food while vacationing in Hawaii to help the state become a more sustainable tourist destination, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Hawaii. This is good news for local farmers, ranchers and other food producers, as well as restaurants promoting farm-to-table menus. […]]]>

Mainland visitors are willing to pay more for local food while vacationing in Hawaii to help the state become a more sustainable tourist destination, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Hawaii.

This is good news for local farmers, ranchers and other food producers, as well as restaurants promoting farm-to-table menus.

But to reduce our reliance on food imports – around 90% of our food is imported – and truly support the agricultural industry on the islands, the commitment to buy local needs to have more impact.

This means we all need to support local agriculture. Not just visitors – there were a record 10 million in 2019 – but all of us.

The purchase must be significant. There can’t be a single restaurant in Chinatown that orders small bags of micro-vegetables from a local farmer twice a month. That’s not enough to sustain even a secondary hustle, let alone a full-time farming operation.

Where I see a solution – and it is a solution that is already in motion – is for restaurant chains and hotels to commit to sourcing as much as possible from local food producers.

Visitors need to eat, and if they’re willing to pay extra or more for locally grown food – as 78% of 454 respondents to the study published in the Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights said they would do – restaurants and hotels can recoup the cost of buying local produce, which tends to be more expensive than meats, eggs, and imported produce sold at wholesale prices.

It is already happening. Zippy’s Restaurants, which has 24 locations on three islands and plans to open in Las Vegas in 2023, switched to using local beef in its popular chili, burger patties and spaghetti in 2010.

Today, the restaurant chain makes about 100 tons of chili per month on average, says Jason Higa, CEO of Zippy’s parent company, FCH Enterprises. In 2020, Zippy’s used more than 70,000 pounds of ground beef per month to make its chili and meat sauces, about half of which came from local ranchers. (It’s more of a supply issue than a demand issue.)

Kunia Country cultivates aquaponics with a view of the crops.
Kunia Country Farms, which uses aquaponics, has been supplying lettuce and green salads to Zippy’s restaurants since 2018. Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2022

“As much as we can source locally, we will,” Higa said. “And in almost all cases, it’s at a higher price. But I think our customers are ready to support local agriculture.

Plus, Zippy’s sources all of its eggs—think all those loco mocos—from Eggs Hawaii, noodles from Sun Noodle, and tomatoes and papayas from local farms. And since 2018, the restaurant chain has worked with Kunia Country Farms in central Oahu to supply all of its lettuce and salad greens. According to owner Jason Brand, the deal has not only increased revenue for the farm, which grows its greens aquaponically, but it has provided the security of a consistent buyer and allowed the farm to grow from 45%.

It’s a win-win situation – for the restaurant, the farm and the person who eats locally grown fresh vegetables.

“We would like to buy more locally, but given the size of our operation, it’s not always operationally or financially viable, but when we can, we’ll choose local,” says Kevin Yim, vice president of the marketing at Zippy’s. “We believe that buying local supports local jobs and is an important part of our sourcing process.”

Hotels are also buying more locally grown produce and meats. And since they feed thousands of people a day – the vast majority of whom are visitors who expect (or are willing) to pay more for food while on vacation – these hotels buy significant amounts of food from local farms, who need large accounts and consistent orders to survive.

According to the Hawaii Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, visitors to the islands in 2021 spent $2.7 million on food and drink, most of which was at restaurants. Food was the second biggest expense for visitors behind accommodation.

I remember visiting the kitchen at the Royal Hawaiian in Waikiki in 2018 with then-executive chef Colin Hazama, who oversaw the hotel‘s culinary operations, which included two restaurants, a beachfront bar, a bakery and a luau that operated four nights a week.

He said that at the time, the hotel worked with more than 30 local farms, using asparagus from Twin Bridge Farms in Waialua, oysters from Kualoa Ranch and Manoa lettuce from Mari’s Gardens in Mililani. About 60% of the food served at the hotel was grown in Hawaii. The shelves of one of the walk-in refrigerators were filled with boxes from Ho Farms in Kahuku, Hamakua Mushrooms in Lapahoehoe and Kawamata Farm in Kamuela. “See,” he told me then. “We really buy from local farms.”

James Beard Award-winning chef Roy Yamaguchi has been supporting Hawaii’s farmers, ranchers and fishers for decades. It sources from more than 60 different local suppliers for its 10 restaurants on four islands. You’ll see Kona kampachi on the menu at Eating House 1849, Kula mesclun at Humble Market Kitchin (STET) and wild boar at Roy’s Waikoloa.

“In almost all cases, it’s at a higher price. But I think our customers are ready to support local agriculture. — Jason Higa, CEO of FCH Enterprises

Robynne Maii — who won the James Beard Award for Best Chef: Pacific Northwest this year, Hawaii’s first female chef to do so — built her restaurant, Fete, around sourcing locally. She says that, every day, around 75-90% of the produce she uses and 90% of the meat, dairy and seafood are local. In fact, if she can’t find an ingredient, she changes the menu.

“We are working very hard on it,” she says. “And it’s not easy because of supply issues. But it’s important to us. »

And that should be important to all of us.

While the state government, one of the biggest buyers of food, supplying schools, prisons and hospitals, can do better by buying local – and it does; a law passed last year requires public schools statewide to source at least 30% of school lunch ingredients from local producers by 2030 — there are other meaningful ways to support the local agriculture.

But we can’t just leave it up to visitors to support our local farms and restaurants. We must do the same. Make sustainable choices when dining out. Shop at farmers markets. Sign up for a CSA.

And agree to pay more. It’s worth it.

“Hawaii Grown” is funded in part by grants from the Stupski Foundation, the Hawaii Community Foundation’s Ulupono Fund, and the Frost Family Foundation.

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Luxury African safaris that support local communities https://gillansinn.com/luxury-african-safaris-that-support-local-communities/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 16:08:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/luxury-african-safaris-that-support-local-communities/ A lot of things go into a bucket list trip like an African safari, whether you realize it or not. While you’re obsessed with spotting the Big Five – lions, leopards, rhinos, elephants and African buffaloes – or gazing at your serene surroundings from the comfort of your lodge, the hospitality industry is having an […]]]>

A lot of things go into a bucket list trip like an African safari, whether you realize it or not. While you’re obsessed with spotting the Big Five – lions, leopards, rhinos, elephants and African buffaloes – or gazing at your serene surroundings from the comfort of your lodge, the hospitality industry is having an impact in behind the scenes.

Top luxury lodges and tour operators are directly involved in creating programs that empower people in nearby communities and promote sustainable tourism practices that help protect the natural environments and wildlife that surround them. This ensures that such an expensive vacation brings great economic and social benefits to local communities.

I witnessed many of these initiatives first hand during my visit to Africa. They opened my eyes to all that goes on in safari lodges – and changed my view of African safaris.

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Related: 5 cool wildlife conservation activities for families around the world

Enjoying a luxurious safari vacation doesn’t just mean enjoying incredible service, breathtaking views and gourmet cuisine. Premium safaris are also a celebration of the areas in which they operate, as they draw attention to the importance of protecting endangered species, conserving natural resources and creating jobs and economic opportunities for surrounding communities. .

Many African safari operators and lodges have programs that give back and protect wildlife, but there are several high-end properties and businesses that go above and beyond to incorporate philanthropic efforts into their offerings. These allow you to effortlessly support initiatives that create lasting support systems for the people and places you meet while enjoying an epic journey you’ll never forget.

Be aware though that not all companies take the same approach to giving back, so it’s important that you do your homework beforehand. Check an operator’s website for information about its programs and pay particular attention to charitable initiatives. Safari lodges that run their own programs will outline their commitments directly in their mission statements or highlight their scope at the top of their homepages.

To help you get started, we’ve scoured the web and drawn from our personal experiences to highlight three safari operators with great social initiatives. While they are far from the only companies doing their part to positively impact local communities, they stand out for the scope and scale of what they do on the ground.

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Singita

Singita is known for having some of the most luxurious safari lodges in Southern and Eastern Africa, with properties in enviable locations such as Sabi Sands Game Reserve in South Africa, Grumeti Game Reserve in Tanzania and National Volcanoes of Rwanda.

At each of the company’s six sites, conservation, wildlife management and community partnerships form an important part of its operations. However, there is one place that is particularly memorable for the work he does: Pamushana Lodge.

Located in Zimbabwe’s Malilangwe Game Reserve, Singita’s Pamushana Lodge spearheads an extensive food program that provides 19,000 local children with nutrient-dense meals every day. The Supplementary Feeding Programme, which was launched in the early 2000s after food shortages across Zimbabwe caused by persistent droughts, focuses on toddlers, young children and school-aged students so that hunger does not hinder their development and education.

One of the details that stuck with me long after my visit to Pamushana was seeing some of the women who had been empowered to run the programs in the 436 feeding points and 11 primary schools. Each leader derived great satisfaction from her work. This passion for helping the community was hard to miss, as every child I encountered was smiling from ear to ear.

ROSS CUTER/SINGITA

Several locations in South Africa, Rwanda and Tanzania also offer Community Culinary Schools, another unique Singita program that focuses on food but in a completely different way.

Through this initiative, Singita offers a professional-level cooking school experience to qualified members of the communities closest to its participating lodges. These are rigorous culinary programs led by professors who could easily work in a cosmopolitan city, as I witnessed during my stay at the Kruger National Park settlement. Everything I tried was delicious and seeing the students beaming with pride at their creations was priceless.

By helping local youth learn to become chefs, Singita not only broadens participants’ horizons, but also enables them to financially support their families. After all, the program helps pave the way for many kitchen jobs at Singita lodges and beyond. In fact, one graduate even performed at the Michelin-starred Blue Hill at Stone Barns in New York City.

Related: Everything you need to know to go on an African safari with renowned expert Marlon du Toit

great plains

Known for its conservation-focused programs and ultra-exclusive lodges in East Africa and Botswana, Great Plains aims to shed light on the connection between people, land and wildlife. The group seeks to do this through a series of projects that it has created and overseen over several decades with the help of its owners, Derek and Beverly Joubert – two figures well known in the safari world and beyond for their National Geographic documentaries that shed light on everything from endangered rhinos to relocating elephants.

Unsurprisingly, the Jouberts excel in conservation efforts, including some unique Great Plains-related projects.

Through Solar Lanterns, an initiative of the Great Plains Foundation, a safe light source is brought to families on the edges of the Okavango Delta in Botswana so that they can safely carry out their daily activities. By offering mason jar-style solar-powered lanterns, which are free, families in the community can rely less on flammable (and expensive) light sources like paraffin lanterns and candles. (Even if you’re not going on safari with Great Plains, you can donate a lantern through this link.)

GREAT PLAINS

Another notable Great Plains initiative is its female ranger program in the Okavango Delta and Sapi Game Reserve in Zimbabwe.

Traditionally, most rangers at safari lodges have been male, as they often have more educational opportunities and fewer hurdles to contend with when it comes to career prospects. As a result, there have always been few female guards on game reserves.

To address this issue, Great Plains provides education, resources and skills development opportunities to local Motswanese and Zimbabwean women so they can become forest rangers. Through these roles, participants serve as ambassadors for conservation, leaders in their local communities, and role models for young girls near and far.

Related: How to make sure your safari is ethical

Micato safaris

A leader in the premium safari industry that combines authentic experiences with ultra-luxury accommodation and top-notch guides, Micato Safaris goes far beyond arranging one-of-a-kind African adventures. The tour operator’s programs truly stand out in the African tourism industry.

One that you can learn more about by browsing the company’s website is its One for One Pledge, a program that sends a child to school for every safari booked. The group covers everything from uniforms and books to tuition, so there are no out-of-pocket expenses for student families.

JEFF CARINGE/MICATO

Plus, there’s Micato’s AmericaShare initiative, which began over 35 years ago. He established the Harambee Community Center in the Mukuru slum in Nairobi, Kenya, to provide the community with access to much needed services, such as education, technology, clean water and HIV/AIDS treatment. (Note that Micato can arrange AmericaShare tours if you’re traveling with them via Nairobi.)

From this AmericaShare program was born another equally important initiative: Huru International. Created by AmericaShare co-founder Lorna Macleod, this non-profit organization has a double duty of helping girls go to school by providing sanitary supplies and training unemployed women to make these products. By making it easier to access everything needed during menstruation, young women are more likely to stay in school and learn valuable skills they can apply to future careers.

Since its inception in 2008, Huru International has produced over 1.3 million high quality reusable pads, which have been given to over 175,000 girls across East Africa.

Related: Best Ways to Redeem Points and Miles for Safaris

At the end of the line

Going on safari not only opens a window to the wonders of Africa’s wilderness, but also opens a door to help others through social initiative programs created by local lodges.

Whether you book with one of these tour operators or choose another after doing your own research, you will find that it is possible to have an unforgettable holiday in Africa that will change the lives of others as well as you. By supporting sustainable development initiatives while visiting Africa, you will be doing your part to ensure the prosperity of our planet and its people for generations to come.

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September’s Bounty at Oregon North Coast Farmers’ Markets: What’s New https://gillansinn.com/septembers-bounty-at-oregon-north-coast-farmers-markets-whats-new/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 00:30:51 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/septembers-bounty-at-oregon-north-coast-farmers-markets-whats-new/ September’s Bounty at Oregon North Coast Farmers’ Markets: What’s New Published on 09/11/22 at 17:25By the staff of the Oregon Coast Beach Connection (Manzanita, Oregon) – It just feels like a long summer in Oregon and Washington, with all the above average heat. But in reality, summer got off to a late start, not really […]]]>

September’s Bounty at Oregon North Coast Farmers’ Markets: What’s New

Published on 09/11/22 at 17:25
By the staff of the Oregon Coast Beach Connection

(Manzanita, Oregon) – It just feels like a long summer in Oregon and Washington, with all the above average heat. But in reality, summer got off to a late start, not really starting until July – and barely. Which means that on the Oregon Coast, its extensive collection of farmers’ markets is always cooking – like a bustling, bouncy, buzzing activity. (Photo by Heirloom Tomatoes in Tillamook County, courtesy photo)

Along the North Oregon Coast, the North Coast Food Trail enters its new season of foodie fun as farmers markets begin to get new treats. Yet these independent vendors of freshness are also entering their final weeks, with September typically closing outdoor markets. However, there are still a few days to a few weeks left to catch the yummy stuff.

According to Explore Tillamook Coast:


Manzanita: photo copyright Oregon Coast Beach Connection

“Some harvests started more slowly thanks to the rains in June. But since then, the warm sun has encouraged a bountiful harvest.

Explore Tillamook Coast has provided a short list of new harvest items:

The blueberries have flowed in and they are often foraged.

Finally, tomatoes are in the game, Explore Tillamook Coast said, along with cantaloupes, yellow onions and purple artichokes.

Perfect for salads, pickling or canning (or imitating Dwight Schrute), beets are all the rage. Look for green beans, cauliflower, broccoli and corn. Want a little spice with your visit to the Oregon Coast? Chilis are featured now. In the realm of more comfort foods, hip and fresh seasonal potatoes, yams and pumpkins should be on your list.

“And don’t forget all the other gourmet goodies available: jams, coffee, bakery, sweets, tea, meat and fish,” the agency said.

The North Coast Food Trail covers approximately 85 miles with approximately 60 stops to feed your throat and expand your palate. You can find the full list of this delightful means of exploration here.

For farmers’ markets, you’ll find them large and small at Seaside, Astoria, Cannon Beach, Manzanita, Tillamook and Neskowin. See:

The Astoria Sunday Market takes place at the 12th and Commercial in downtown Astoria, offering some truly unique foods. Up to 200 vendors show up every week from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The entire effort now spans four entire blocks and runs through October.

Among the highlights is its food court, which can get quite international. Delicious finds like Salvadoran food or wood-fired pizzas can be found, as well as plenty of gourmet pizzas and crab cakes. 503-440-7168. Astoria Market website.

In Seaside, the Seaside Farmers Market takes place in September every Wednesday from 2pm to 6pm. Lots of organic produce, pasture-raised meats, artisan products and cheeses, and a bustling food court are part of the outdoor fun. There is also loads of live music every week. It’s at 1120 Broadway St., Seaside, Oregon. Seaside Farmers Market website.


Cannon Beach Farmers Market, courtesy photo

The Cannon Beach Farmers Market is a long-standing treasure on the Oregon coast that runs every Tuesday from 1-5 p.m., featuring artisan produce, seafood, mushrooms, fresh produce, meat and live music. It runs until September 17 at 163 East Gower Avenue. 503-436-8044. Market website.

In Manzanita, Underhill Plaza (635 Manzanita Ave.) is the place to be every Friday night for the Manzanita Farmers Market. It operates from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. until September 17 of this year. Wineries are also a specialty here, as well as all the fresh and often innovative produce this part of the Oregon North Coast is known for. 503-836-3534. Manzanita Farmer’s Market website.

The Tillamook Farmers’ Market runs every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. through September, at the corner of Laurel Avenue and Second Street in downtown Tillamook. Among all these cool goodies, the event also features live music and activities for kids. 503-842-7525. Market website.

Josi Farms is a daily farm, showing its farm with tours on Saturdays during the summer months. Every Saturday you can pick up locally grown food from his farm from 1-3 p.m. 735 Wilson River Loop Road. Tillamook, Oregon. 503-812-1506.

The Neskowin Farmers Market is a unique stop along the North Coast Food Tour, nestled in the small town and held on Saturdays from 9am-1pm. 503-715-6252. Market website.

Hotels in Astoria – Where to Eat – Astoria Maps and Virtual Tours

Seaside Hotels – Where to eat – Seaside maps and virtual tours

Cannon Beach Hotels – Where to eat – Maps and virtual tours of Cannon Beach

Save on Top Manzanita Hotels – Where to eat – Manzanita, Wheeler Maps and Virtual Tours

Rockaway Beach Hotels – Where to eat – Maps and virtual tours of Rockaway Beach

Tillamook Bay Hotels – Where to eat – Maps and virtual tours of Tillamook

Three Caps Hotels – Where to eat – Maps of the three capes and virtual tours



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Glacier National Park transitions to fall operations amid first snowfall of season | Local https://gillansinn.com/glacier-national-park-transitions-to-fall-operations-amid-first-snowfall-of-season-local/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/glacier-national-park-transitions-to-fall-operations-amid-first-snowfall-of-season-local/ WEST GLACIER, MONTANA – As the fall season approaches, operations in the park will begin to wind down. On September 11, the fleet’s 2022 vehicle reservation pilot study will end. Visitors are encouraged to plan ahead and be prepared for temporary traffic restrictions at the west entrance due to congestion. Construction of the Lake McDonald […]]]>

WEST GLACIER, MONTANA – As the fall season approaches, operations in the park will begin to wind down. On September 11, the fleet’s 2022 vehicle reservation pilot study will end. Visitors are encouraged to plan ahead and be prepared for temporary traffic restrictions at the west entrance due to congestion.

Construction of the Lake McDonald Utilities Project will continue along Going-to-the-Sun Road from the south end of Lake McDonald near Apgar Campground to Sprague Campground Creek through September causing short delays in both directions during the day. The construction zone will be closed Monday through Saturday, 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. every night until October 1.

On October 1, the west side of Going-to-the-Sun Road will be closed for the season from the Apgar four-way intersection to Logan Pass due to the Lake McDonald Utilities project and team operations. road. On the east side, Going-to-the-Sun Road is expected to remain open from St. Mary to Logan Pass until midnight Sunday, October 16, unless winter conditions force an early closure. There will be no access to potable water at Logan Pass beginning September 11.

Hiker/Cyclist access is permitted on the road closure west of Logan Pass to North McDonald Road while the GNP Road Crew is not working. A daily road crew closure will be in place while crews are working. Visitors are advised that the return to Logan Pass consists of steep uphill terrain.

The park shuttles will remain in service until September 18 with reduced services. Beginning September 6, the shuttle service will operate from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily with all stops in operation. Wait times can be over 20 minutes as there are fewer shuttles on the road. Visitors planning to use the shuttle should see the Shuttle page for details.

The Logan Pass Visitor Center will continue daily visitor information services through Sunday, September 25. Potable water will not be available at Logan Pass beginning September 11.

St. Mary’s Visitor Center will continue daily visitor information services through Sunday, October 2. Drinking water will no longer be available at St. Mary’s after Monday, October 11.

The Apgar Visitor Center will continue daily visitor information services until Monday, October 10, then transition to weekends until October 23, weather permitting. Restrooms and potable water are available in the Apgar Visitor Center plaza year-round.

Frontcountry campgrounds will adjust as follows:

  • Apgar: reservation required until September 11, first come, first served until October 3, and primitive status in loop B only until spring 2023.
  • Fish Creek: Reservations required until September 4 closing.
  • Sprague Creek: Reservation required until September 11 closing.
  • Bowman: First-come, first-served through September 9, and primitive status through weather-dependent closing.
  • Kintla: First come, first served until September 8 and primitive status until closing depending on weather conditions.
  • Several ice cream parlors: half reservation, half first come, first served until September 18 and primitive status until closing on October 31.
  • St. Mary: first-come, first-served until September 15 and primitive status in Loop C only until spring 2023.
  • Rising Sun: first come, first served until closing on September 8.
  • Two Medicine: First-come, first-served until September 19 and primitive status until closing depending on weather conditions.

Primitive status campgrounds have vault toilets available and fees are reduced. No campground reservations are issued at primitive campgrounds and all camping is first come, first served. Visit the park’s Camping page for more information on camping.

Avalanche Creek, Cut Bank, and Logging Creek Campgrounds remained closed for the 2022 season. Quartz Creek Campground is temporarily closed due to the Quartz Fire. Visitors can check the campground page for updates.

Wild camping requires a permit, which can be obtained at the Apgar Wilderness permit office. The permit office is open from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. until September 30 and from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. until October 31. Wilderness permits will be issued up to 30 minutes before closing. Advance reservations for wilderness permits are available through September 23. Walk-in permits are issued up to 24 hours in advance. See the Wild Camping page for more information.

Lake McDonald, Lake Bowman and Lake Kintla will be the only vehicle-accessible water bodies open to watercraft in the park after September 30. Boat Inspection Station hours are 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily at Lake McDonald and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Polebridge until September 30. Effective October 1, inspection hours will change from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Lake McDonald and Polebridge. All waters in the park are closed to boats as of November 1.

Concession services (lodging, food, retail, horseback riding, boat and bus tours) began to shrink. All concession services will close for the season in early October. Visitors should check directly with the services on our website for hours of operation.

Fall visitors to Glacier National Park will find cooler temperatures and are encouraged to prepare for changeable weather with the potential for rain or snow, especially in the alpine regions. As fall approaches, bear activity will increase. Visitors are asked to consider attractant storage requirements and remember that pets are not permitted on the trails at any time. Learn more about bear safety on the park’s website.

The park is open year-round and recreational opportunities can be found in all seasons. Winter recreation will be limited on Going-to-the-Sun Road along Lake McDonald for the 2022-2023 winter season due to the utility project. For more information, visit the park’s website or call the park’s headquarters at 406-888-7800.

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King’s Guest Ranch Named Most Unique Airbnb in North Dakota https://gillansinn.com/kings-guest-ranch-named-most-unique-airbnb-in-north-dakota/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 22:35:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/kings-guest-ranch-named-most-unique-airbnb-in-north-dakota/ DICKINSON, ND (KFYR) — Travelers across the country use Airbnb for unique lodging. It’s also a way for owners to share their piece of paradise with others. Tucked away in the badlands of North Dakota is an Airbnb like no other. “You can’t find that anywhere. It’s almost like a different planet. I feel like […]]]>

DICKINSON, ND (KFYR) — Travelers across the country use Airbnb for unique lodging. It’s also a way for owners to share their piece of paradise with others.

Tucked away in the badlands of North Dakota is an Airbnb like no other. “You can’t find that anywhere. It’s almost like a different planet. I feel like I’m on Mars or something,” said Stacey Baratto, Minnesota.

Rhonda and Jeff King are the proud owners of King’s Guest Ranch. Visitors can stay in one of two parked motorhomes that look more like hotel rooms. “Really, all they bring is their clothes and their food that they want to prepare. Everything else is there for them,” said Rhonda King, owner of King’s Guest Ranch.

But what sets this Airbnb apart is what you see out the window and the trails you can explore. “Every week people say you don’t know how blessed you are to live here and I’m like, oh believe me, I know that,” Rhonda said. She says that after retiring, the couple came up with the idea of ​​creating an Airbnb on their ranch. She says they have welcomed many guests, some with their horses, from all over. “New Jersey, Kentucky,” Rhonda said.

Their home has even garnered national attention. “I always ask the same question: what brings you to North Dakota? when I record them, and they say you, and I say you mean Medora…and they say no, this place,” Rhonda said. Travel and Leisure magazine named King’s Guest Ranch as the most unique Airbnb in North Dakota. “The hairs on my arms stood up and I went home, and I started crying,” Rhonda said.

With fall fast approaching, there is still time to book your stay.

To book at King’s Guest Ranch, visit Airbnb or find them on Facebook. Rhonda says their season usually starts in April and ends in November.

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Spotlight: Local Entertainment Listings | Calendar https://gillansinn.com/spotlight-local-entertainment-listings-calendar/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 14:30:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/spotlight-local-entertainment-listings-calendar/ Alchemy faucet project: 7:30-9:30 p.m. September 17, Columbia Theater Association for the Performing Arts, 1231 Vandercook Way, Longview. A Seattle-based performance company for serious tap dancers 16+. The company was founded in 2012 on the principles of experimentation, entertainment and excellence, according to the theater’s website. The band became a regular on Pacific Northwest stages. […]]]>

Alchemy faucet project: 7:30-9:30 p.m. September 17, Columbia Theater Association for the Performing Arts, 1231 Vandercook Way, Longview. A Seattle-based performance company for serious tap dancers 16+. The company was founded in 2012 on the principles of experimentation, entertainment and excellence, according to the theater’s website. The band became a regular on Pacific Northwest stages. Tickets: $40 and $45 per person for adults, $40 per person for seniors 62 and over and military, and $20 per person for children up to 17 years old. Tickets available at the box office (11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday), by calling 360-575-8499 or by visiting columbiatheatre.com.

Cowlitz County Farmers MarketOpen: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday through October 29 and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday through September 13 in front of the Cowlitz County Event (Expo) Center, 1900 Seventh Ave., Longview. Participants are asked to park in the designated area and keep pets on a leash. 360-957-7023. facebook.com/cowlitzfarmersmarket/.

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Kalama Farmers Market: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Thursdays and 4 p.m.-7 p.m. the second Thursday of the month until September 8 in the parking lot outside the Kalama Public Library, 312 N. First St., Kalama. Info: Look for Kalama Chamber of Commerce on Facebook.

Wine and Gastronomy FestivalSept. 15-18, Ilani, 1 Cowlitz Way, Ridgefield. For a full list of chefs, events and more, visit ilaniwineandfoodfest.com.

Cowlitz Valley Early Music Association: 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sept. 2 and 16, country and bluegrass music, open-mic program and dancing. Catlin Grange, 205 Shawnee, N. Kelso. 360-423-3138.

Kalama Harbor Lodge (Harbour Lounge): music by Mick Overman, 7-10 p.m., Sept. 7. Overman’s music is described as bluesy folk and roll with a jazzy attitude. For more details on Overman, visit mickoverman.com. Music by David Johnson and Christopher Gray with Amy Bleu. Free, all ages are welcome. 215 N. Hendrickson Drive, Kalama. 360-673-9209.

Oak Restaurant: 6 p.m.-8 p.m. on September 8, music by Claire Beck Radio. 1020 Atlantic Ave, Woodland. 360-841-5292.

Oregon Way Tavern: open jam hosted by Steelhead, 7 p.m. on Wednesdays; 9 p.m. Karaoke, Thursday through Saturday, 446 Oregon Way, Longview. 360-577-5773.

Roland Wines: 6pm-8pm Sept. 8, blues evening with music by Kevin Selfe on guitar and vocals, Denins Lusk on organ, John Cavanaugh on bass and Alan Cook on drums. 1106 Florida Street, Longview. 360-846-7304.

Storyboard Delights: 7:30-9:30 p.m. September 3, Jazz Night, 1339 Commerce Ave., Suite 103, Longview. 360-703-6255.

“Clue on Stage”: Comic policeman. Sept. 9-Oct. 2; 7:30 p.m. from Friday to Saturday, 2 p.m. on Sunday. Stageworks Northwest Theatre, 1433 Commerce Ave., Longview. General admission: $18 per person, seniors/students/veterans: $14 per person, children: $8 per child. Group discounts, flexible passes available. Tickets on stageworksnorthwest.com or in person at the box office 3-6 p.m. Wednesday-Friday and one hour before the show. 360-636-4488.

Broadway Gallery: Featured artists for September are Weylan Johnson, gallery member, housescapes; and guest artist Vicki Green, glass. Join the artists for the first Thursday from 5:30-7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month for music and refreshments. Works by artists are exhibited throughout the month alongside 40 local cooperative galleries. Craft cards, masks, jewelry, books by local authors, pottery, sculpture, glass, metal, photography, wearable art and more available. Shop the fourth local Saturday of each month to receive a free gift. The public is invited to celebrate the gallery’s 40th anniversary from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on September 17 with live music, refreshments and fine arts and crafts designs. No purchase necessary for the first raffle ticket. The musical lineup included Stephen Harvey from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., John S. Crocker from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., and Keith Hinyard from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Regular hours: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday. 1418 Commerce Avenue, Longview. 577-0544. http://the-broadway-gallery.com, www.facebook.com/TheBroadwayGallery.

Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum: “Grand Hotels of the North Beach Peninsula” runs until October 9th. The exhibit was reopened with a new car, the Tandem Sporting Gig (circa 1890s) on loan from Raymond Washington’s Northwest Carriage Museum. The exhibit highlights major hotels built on the Long Beach Peninsula to provide extravagant entertainment, awe-inspiring accommodations, and extraordinary service and food, according to a museum press release. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the resort industry began on the North Beach Peninsula with large resorts such as The Sea View House, Hackney Cottage, Portland, Breakers, Driftwood, and Long Beach; and smaller hotels such as Harvest Home, Gables and Shagren’s Hotel. Hotels would advertise in the Oregonian or Oregon Journal to attract visitors. Meanwhile, some families stayed for up to three months during the summer, sometimes bringing the family cow or a horse and cart. Transport from Portland was via steamships such as the TJ Potter which would dock at Ilwaco where it would be met by train or local cars, wagons or buggies. The exhibits are funded in part by the Pacific County Lodging Tax Fund and the City of Long Beach Lodging Tax Fund. Permanent exhibits on Lewis and Clark and the Columbia River, an 1890 railroad car, and a model of the old train that traveled up the Long Beach Peninsula. Opening hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday. FREE ENTRANCE. 115 SE Lake, Ilwaco. 360-642-3446; columbiapacificheritagemuseum.org.

Cowlitz County Historical Museum: Opening hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday to Saturday. Donations accepted. 405 Allen Street, Kelso. 577-3119. www.co.cowlitz.wa.us/museum.

Koth Memorial Gallery: Opening hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to Thursday, 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, closed on Sundays. Longview Public Library, 1600 Louisiana St., Longview. Daniel: 360-442-5307.

Forsberg Art Gallery of Lower Columbia College: Opening hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Thursday. In the college’s Rose Center for the Arts gallery, 1528 Maple St., Longview. 360-442-2510; www.lowercolumbia.edu/gallery.

Rainier Historical Museum of Oregon: Hours: 12 p.m.-4 p.m. Saturday (except holidays), Third Floor of City Hall, 106 W. B St., Rainier. Old photos or items that people would like to share or donate to the museum are welcome. Old photos can be scanned and the originals returned to the owners. 503-556-4089, 360-751-7039, kay-lynn2@hotmail.com.

River Life Interpretive Center at Redmen Hall/Central School: The Grand Ol’ Flag Patriotic Exhibition runs until August 28th. The exhibition will reflect the history of the flags and their meaning. It will also include service memorabilia, uniforms, etc. Opening hours: noon-4 p.m. Friday to Sunday. 1394 State Route 4 (Ocean Beach Highway). 360-795-3007, leave a message; or fos1894@gmail.com.

Stella Historical Museum: Opening hours: 11am-4pm on Saturdays and Sundays in summer and by appointment. Historical exhibits on logging, fishing and agriculture, and more. Besides the old post office building, the museum complex includes the newly renovated forge, the material shed and the new forge building. The forge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Admission: free, but donations appreciated. 360-423-3860 or 360-423-8663.

Wahkiakum County Historical Society Museum: Extensive logging, fishing and cultural exhibits. Locomotive from 1923 outside. Opening hours: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. from Saturday to Sunday until September or by appointment. 65 River Street, Cathlamet. 360-849-4353.

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Visitor spending in Williamson County tops $1 billion https://gillansinn.com/visitor-spending-in-williamson-county-tops-1-billion/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 14:45:20 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/visitor-spending-in-williamson-county-tops-1-billion/ A few storefronts as they walk down Main Street in downtown Franklin, Tennessee. Photo courtesy of Visit Franklin. Visitor spending generated $1.04 billion in direct economic impact on Williamson County in 2021, according to recently released data from the US Travel Association and Tourism Economics. This is a 34% increase over the previous year and […]]]>

A few storefronts as they walk down Main Street in downtown Franklin, Tennessee. Photo courtesy of Visit Franklin.

Visitor spending generated $1.04 billion in direct economic impact on Williamson County in 2021, according to recently released data from the US Travel Association and Tourism Economics. This is a 34% increase over the previous year and on par with 2018 economic impact levels. According to data from DK Shifflet, the county welcomed 1.73 million visitors in 2021 , an increase of 40.5% over 2020. These visitors were spending $2.86 million per day in Williamson County.

The positive growth in economic impact and visitation marks a return to year-over-year growth in the impact of tourism on the county. Prior to the COVID-induced downturn in 2020, the tourism industry had increased its positive economic impact on Williamson County for 10 consecutive years.

Williamson County remained ranked No. 6 of Tennessee’s 95 counties based on economic impact from tourism and was one of six counties in the state to create a positive impact of more than $1 billion. dollars.

“While our industry was still feeling the effects of COVID on travel at the start of 2021, it is encouraging to see the progress our local hotels and hospitality-related businesses are making towards rebounding,” said Maureen Haley Thornton, President and CEO of Visit Franklin. “These final 2021 numbers show that once people were comfortable traveling, Franklin and Williamson County communities are where they wanted to be.”

Tourism-related spending generated $55.31 million in the state and $34.7 million in local tax revenue in Williamson County. Due to tourism, every household in Williamson County pays $1,111 less in state and local taxes. The county’s hospitality industry also accounted for 7,540 jobs.

Within the hospitality industry, hotels and lodging saw the most significant economic impact recovery, jumping 70% from 2021. Leisure spending increased 38%, retail spending visitors increased by 21%, transport increased by 20% and food and beverages had an economic impact. 31% increase compared to 2021.

The Williamson County Convention and Visitors Bureau (Visit Franklin) operates from a portion of local lodging taxes from hotels and vacation rentals collected from visitors. These collections are then reinvested in sales and marketing efforts to bring people to Williamson County for leisure travel and sports, meetings and group business. In 2021, every dollar invested in Visit Franklin’s efforts resulted in a positive economic impact of $387 on the county. This figure is up from $312 in 2020.

Despite the lingering effects of COVID on the hospitality and tourism industry in early 2021, local industry growth was boosted by the opening of three more hotels during the year and new iconic venues like the FirstBank Amphitheatre. The outlook for 2022 is also one of continued growth, as four new hotels have already opened in the county this year, along with the upcoming opening of Southall Farm & Inn.

Thornton added: “Throughout 2021, our hotels have seen a large number of leisure travelers which, in addition to the gradual return of business travellers, meetings, conventions and events, has contributed to the recovery of our county. This return to travel is also continuing at an optimistic pace in 2022. With new hotels and venues opening in 2021 and already this year, as well as those opening soon, tourism in our county is poised to continue having increased positive economic impact on Williamson County.

The majority of funds raised each year through the Lodging Tax are distributed to participating cities for use in capital projects aimed at improving tourism that also benefit residents, such as improving parks, and contribute to the Williamson County General Fund, where they help offset expenses. county schools, emergency services, road projects, etc.

Economic impact information is determined by the US Travel Association and Tourism Economics and distributed by the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development. The values ​​represent the direct impact of spending, labor income, employment, and taxes on domestic and international travel.

ABOUT VISIT FRANKLIN Visit Franklin is the public brand of the Williamson County Convention & Visitors Bureau. Visit Franklin is the official destination marketing organization for Franklin and the unique communities of Williamson County, Tennessee. Visit Franklin drives economic growth by promoting travel and tourism assets such as history, music, attractions, entertainment, arts and events to visitors around the world. For more information about Franklin and Williamson County, visit us on the web at VisitFranklin.com.

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The million dollar question everyone is asking this season… Which pass is the best? https://gillansinn.com/the-million-dollar-question-everyone-is-asking-this-season-which-pass-is-the-best/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 00:05:50 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/the-million-dollar-question-everyone-is-asking-this-season-which-pass-is-the-best/ Lift pass comparison between Epic, Indy, Mountain Collective and Ikon lift passes. pc: dot guy screenshot The million dollar question A safe answer would be to say ‘it depends’ but it’s not fun and, more importantly, it doesn’t help us make a better decision. We still have questions like: Which pass gives you access to […]]]>
Lift pass comparison between Epic, Indy, Mountain Collective and Ikon lift passes. pc: dot guy screenshot

The million dollar question

A safe answer would be to say ‘it depends’ but it’s not fun and, more importantly, it doesn’t help us make a better decision. We still have questions like:

  • Which pass gives you access to most stations?
  • What is the cheapest way to get to the biggest and most popular beach resorts?
  • Which pass is best to use for the holidays?
  • What’s the best option for those who don’t ski or ride during the holidays, but enjoy the rest of the season?

So what is really the best offer? It looks like CEO Brian Kelly and his team at The Points Guy (TPG) have the answer. The Points Guy is a lifestyle media company with over 100 people committed to giving you “practical advice” at “maximize your travel experience“, according to its website. Kelly’s team of more than 40 experts sifted through this season’s data, analyzing and comparing packages. Here’s what they had to say: (Additional discounts and/or special restrictions may also apply and should be checked on each website for accuracy and details.)

Ikon Pass

With nearly 50 destinations around the world and major attractions like Aspen Snowmass, Palisades Tahoe, Mammoth Mountain, Copper Mountain, Winter Park, Sugarbush, and more, the Ikon pass is undoubtedly a popular choice among skiers and snowboarders. . Ikon offers three different passes:

  • Ikon pass with full access has no restrictions on any of its resorts. It’s also the most expensive pass at $1,179 for adults with discounts for children, military and others.
  • Ikon Base Pass at $869 for adults includes blackout dates and five-visit caps at some resorts, often the most popular ones like Jackson Hole, Alta, Snowbasin and others.
  • Ikon pass 2 days, 3 days or 4 days options with access to any station and they do not need to be used on consecutive days.

Ikon also offers friends and family a 25% discount on lift tickets as well as many other benefits with discounts on accommodation rentals, food, and more.

Epic pass

The epic pass had been another popular pass since its launch in 2008/09. Offering access to 37 different resorts in the United States as well as many more in Canada, Europe, Australia and Japan, it gives holders access to some top-notch resorts.

Similar to the Ikon Pass pricing structure, Epic also offers a range of 3-tier passes, albeit cheaper.

  • Full Epic Pass has no restrictions in the US except for Telluride which is capped at seven days. Prices are $849 for adults and $439 for children (5-12).
  • Epic Local Pass had blackout dates and access and is $639 for adults, $519 (teens 13-18), and $335 (5-12). There is also regional pass options.
  • 1-7 Day Epic Pass offers tiered fares based on resort or travel dates. (For example, Jackson Hole, as a Tier 1 resort, would be more expensive than most, and more expensive on holidays than weekdays.) TPG reports, “With this option (#3), you can finally ski for as little as $38/day for adults and $20/day for children.

Epic also gives Pass holders access to their Epic Mountain Rewards, which feature a whole list of other discounts for your trip(s).

Mountain Collective

Mountain Collective offers a season pass currently at $579 for adults, $479 (13-18) and $189 (5-12) which gives you the opportunity to ski 24 resorts including “…big names like Aspen Snowmass, Taos, Banff, Jackson Hole, Sun Valley and Snowbasin.”

Indy Pass

With both Indy Pass options, you gain access to a family of over 100 small independent ski resorts and counting. They are continually expanding their family and there is certainly no shortage of opportunities here.

  • Indy Pass costs $339 for adults, $189 (<12) and has no blackout dates.
  • Indy Pass+ sits at $299 for adults and $139 for children and includes some restrictions.

TPG shared their analysis of Indy Pass saying: “Since these stations are not part of the larger passes, you will generally see fewer people and more reasonable prices, also for the courses..”

The skiing never stops with sunny days and great coverage.
The skiing never stops with sunny days and great coverage. pc: dot guy screenshot

Answers to our questions

Here are TPG’s answers to our questions:

  • Which pass gives you access to most stations?

“If you want an affordable ski pass that gives you access to as many resorts as possible, then the Indy Pass is the way to go. It’s about a third of the price of other passes (although you’re capped at two days per station).

  • What is the cheapest way to get to the biggest and most popular beach resorts?

“To access a large number of high-end ski resorts, it’s hard to do better than the Epic Pass. The local version of the pass is also ideal if you don’t visit most peak days. The Ikon Pass can also get you unlimited skiing at many other popular resorts. The most suitable package depends on where you prefer to ski in winter.

  • Which pass is best to use for the holidays?

“If you still want to visit some of the bigger mountains, but are considering a few shorter ski trips to different mountains, the Mountain Collective will give you access to popular mountains at a lower price – just be prepared to change. your resorts of choice.”

  • What’s the best option for those who don’t ski or ride during the holidays, but enjoy the rest of the season?

“The more restrictive Ikon and Epic family pass levels are also good money-saving considerations if you don’t want to ski over Christmas, Martin Luther King Jr. Day weekend, or Christmas weekend. Presidents Day.”

With all the options available, it is sometimes difficult to make a choice. Where do you plan to spend your time this season? Which pass do you think is best for you? We would like to know!

Bluebird bowl skiing in Colorado.
Bluebird bowl skiing in Colorado. pc: dot guy screenshot

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New Old Mission Community Center with distillery, cafe and restaurant aims to open Q4 2022 https://gillansinn.com/new-old-mission-community-center-with-distillery-cafe-and-restaurant-aims-to-open-q4-2022/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 04:15:50 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/new-old-mission-community-center-with-distillery-cafe-and-restaurant-aims-to-open-q4-2022/ A new distillery, restaurant, cafe and community gathering space could open on the Old Mission Peninsula as early as this fall. The project, a redevelopment of the Seven Hills shopping complex just north of Devil’s Dive Road, has been underway for two years now. After several delays and back-and-forths with Peninsula Township over zoning and […]]]>

A new distillery, restaurant, cafe and community gathering space could open on the Old Mission Peninsula as early as this fall. The project, a redevelopment of the Seven Hills shopping complex just north of Devil’s Dive Road, has been underway for two years now. After several delays and back-and-forths with Peninsula Township over zoning and other sticking points, the contractors leading the redevelopment effort say they’re finally in the home stretch.

In December 2020, The ticker reported that a trio of local entrepreneurs – Troy Daily, Jay Milliken and Jordan Valdmanis – were buying the two-acre commercial property at 13795 Seven Hills Road on Old Mission Peninsula, with plans for redevelopment. This property includes the Seven Hills Shopping Complex, which previously housed a massage parlour, patent law office and art studio. At the time, Daily, Milliken and Valdmanis were seeking a special use permit from the township to reinvent the complex into a new community center that would potentially include a cafe, distillery tasting room, restaurant, retail space at the retail, a farmers market, health and fitness studios, and boutique accommodations.

While the vision for a community center is still intact, some of these components are no longer part of the plan.

“We had to modify and adjust our plans based on township and health department regulations and all the approvals we have in Peninsula Township,” Daily says. One of the obstacles to this particular project, he notes, is the fact that the Township of Peninsula does not generally work with commercial developments, given that the vast majority of land in Old Mission is zoned residential or agricultural. . “[This property] is really the only commercial land on the peninsula that is not yet developed into a restaurant or commercial activity,” Daily notes. “And so, we’ve struggled with the township trying to figure out what we can and can’t do – because they don’t really know.”

Despite shutdowns and restarts, Daily recounts The ticker that he and his partners – a contingent that now includes a fourth player, Brian Peace – have all the relevant approvals in hand and are finally “under construction” on the Seven Hills project (pictured). He predicts further delays to come due to labor shortages and project backlogs in the construction world, but hopes the project will be complete and ready to open by the “fourth quarter.” of this year “.

The anchor tenant of the new development will be a hybrid café and distillery tasting room that Daily, Milliken, Valdmanis and Peace will own and operate. Called Old Mission Distilling, the business will be a cocktail bar, but with a cafe element that will operate throughout the day. Milliken sees this hybrid setup as a way to bring something new to Old Mission Peninsula.

“We’re all residents of Old Mission, we all grew up here, and we really want to focus on the local community,” says Milliken. “Currently there isn’t really a gathering place on the peninsula unless you want to go to a bar, restaurant or winery. We want to create a kind of community place where people can go, from 7am, all day, all night – a place where you can work, a place where you can have meetings – which will be opened as a ‘come one’, come all’ type of environment. And yes, you will be able to have a drink, but our vision is to have a very nice gathering place for the community.

Old Mission Distilling will not have any distilling or bottling operations on premises at the Seven Hills resort and will not manufacture its own liquor in-house. Instead, the company is partnering with Mammoth Distilling to produce a range of spirits under the Old Mission Distilling label. “They’ll make the spirits for us, but we’ll partner with them to put our own spin on the products and to do one-off runs and seasonal things,” says Milliken. Daily, which works closely with Mammoth for some of its other business ventures including Kayak, Bike & Brew and Jacob’s Farm, says the partnership was a natural and logical fit.

Although it does not make its own spirits, Old Mission Distilling will still be considered a distillery tasting room and therefore have a limited liquor license. Establishments with a distillery license can only serve the alcohol they produce, which means that Old Mission Distilling will not be allowed to serve beer, wine, spirits made by other manufacturers or any other type of alcoholic beverage.

Even given all the delays elsewhere for Old Mission Distilling, Milliken says the project shouldn’t be stuck in liquor license limbo. The business has all necessary approvals from the Michigan Liquor Control Commission and other relevant agencies, and should have its liquor license squared as long as it passes a final inspection.

Beyond the tasting room and cafe, Daily says the new Seven Hill center “will have a restaurant, which we’ll rent out.” Tinker Studio will also occupy part of the resort space, an art studio and longtime tenant of the Seven Hills resort which Milliken says will double its previous square footage.

As for other tenants, Milliken expects the most likely other components of the complex to be retail and a salon. Daily notes that, in accordance with township regulations and zoning requirements, other previously proposed inclusions – such as a farmers market and boutique accommodations element – ​​will not be part of the project at this time.

According to Milliken, the ultimate goal is to find tenants who will underscore the local mission and vision for the development. “The people we talked to for our show, for our retail, for our food and beverage, they’re all local residents of Old Mission,” says Milliken. “You won’t see, say, a Jimmy John’s there. These will be businesses run by young entrepreneurs; artistic people – people who do cool things in the community that make sense. We are very selective about who we want to work with, because we want it to be a really special place. »

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