Hotel – Gillan's Inn http://gillansinn.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 00:53:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://gillansinn.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-favicon-2-32x32.png Hotel – Gillan's Inn http://gillansinn.com/ 32 32 Electric Daisy Carnival will fill hotel rooms with high rates over the weekend https://gillansinn.com/electric-daisy-carnival-will-fill-hotel-rooms-with-high-rates-over-the-weekend/ Wed, 18 May 2022 00:53:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/electric-daisy-carnival-will-fill-hotel-rooms-with-high-rates-over-the-weekend/ Southern Nevada beach resorts are gearing up for another bonanza of special events this weekend when Electric Daisy Carnival fans pour into the Las Vegas Motor Speedway for a three-night electronic dance music festival. Travelers, on average, will be expected to pay upwards of $300 per night in motels and hotels. This will be the […]]]>

Southern Nevada beach resorts are gearing up for another bonanza of special events this weekend when Electric Daisy Carnival fans pour into the Las Vegas Motor Speedway for a three-night electronic dance music festival.

Travelers, on average, will be expected to pay upwards of $300 per night in motels and hotels.

This will be the 11th EDC in Las Vegas and the 26th in the series which began in Los Angeles in 1997.

Room prices have soared across the valley in anticipation of EDC’s arrival on Friday.

A representative from Insomniac, the organization that organizes the festival, won’t say how many people are expected to attend this year’s sold-out event, but past shows, including the most recent in late October – postponed three times out of orderly precautions in response to the COVID-19 pandemic – brought in 150,000 elaborately costumed fans over the three nights.

“I don’t have an exact number, it will come after the show, but it will be pretty much in line with previous years,” said a festival publicist.

Two of the biggest names in electronic dance music will launch their new collaborative project at what has become the biggest electronic dance music event in North America.

Superstar DJ-producers Kaskade and Deadmaus will perform live as KX5 for the first time when they return from the event.

Illenium, Alesso, David Guetta and Morten Present: Future Rave, DJ Snake, Porter Robinson, Zedd, Eric Prydz, Dillon Francis, a DJ set from Grimes, Tiesto, who played every EDC in Las Vegas are other main cast members of EDM playing EDC 2o22. , and hundreds more.

Rising rates

The city’s hotels and motels, now accustomed to raising prices to accommodate thousands of fans at special events thanks to three blockbusters in April, are ready to do it again. Rates have skyrocketed for two weekends of concerts by Korean pop group BTS, the National Association of Broadcasters trade show and the NFL Draft.

A survey of room rates listed on hotels.com conducted Tuesday afternoon determined that the average rate among 84 properties for Friday and Saturday — the dates of EDC’s first two nights — was $382.56 per night. night.

Rates may fluctuate until Friday.

The average daily room rate for the month of May 2021 was $126.91, according to researchers at the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority. The rate in October, the last time EDC was there, was $173.68 a night.

In May 2019, the last time EDC was in town in its regular time slot, the rate was $140.52 a night.

Over the coming weekend, no properties listed on hotels.com will offer rooms for less than $150 a night. The cheapest digs are in Sam’s Town, $194 a night.

Among the highest rates that will be paid by guests are the Prestige Suites at the Palazzo, $836 a night; Wynn and Encore Las Vegas, $799 a night each; The Cromwell, $799; The Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas, now managed by MGM Resorts International, $770; Four Seasons Las Vegas, $700; Caesars Palace, $649; and Bellagio, $549.

A long-awaited “strong weekend”

Virginia Valentine, president and CEO of the Nevada Resorts Association, said special events continue to give the resort industry a boost, which is especially welcome after months of hardship during the pandemic. .

“Las Vegas continues to have a spectacular schedule of special events that draws large crowds and helps move key tourism metrics to pre-pandemic levels on the leisure side of the business,” Valentine said in an email. tuesday. “EDC is an incredibly popular weekend, which is reflected in occupancy levels, room rates and the large number of visitors expected. It should be another strong weekend for the Las Vegas economy.

Contact Richard N. Velotta at rvelotta@reviewjournal.com or 702-477-3893. To follow @RickVelotta on Twitter.

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Orient Express will open a second Italian hotel in Venice https://gillansinn.com/orient-express-will-open-a-second-italian-hotel-in-venice/ Mon, 16 May 2022 13:44:15 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/orient-express-will-open-a-second-italian-hotel-in-venice/ Orient Express has signed an agreement with the Italian hotel group Arsenale SpA to open a hotel at Palazzo Donà Giovannelli. Architect and interior designer Aline Asmar from Amman and her studio Culture in architecture is to design and decorate the highly anticipated property. An extraordinary site A famous stop on the legendary Orient Express […]]]>

Orient Express has signed an agreement with the Italian hotel group Arsenale SpA to open a hotel at Palazzo Donà Giovannelli.

Architect and interior designer Aline Asmar from Amman and her studio Culture in architecture is to design and decorate the highly anticipated property.

An extraordinary site

A famous stop on the legendary Orient Express train, Venice is the setting for the hotel brand’s second hotel in Italy. This Orient Express hotel is expected to open in early 2024.

Upon opening, the hotel will place guests just 10 minutes from Santa Lucia train station and next to the Cannaregio shopping area. The site itself, Palazzo Donà Giovannelli, was built in 1400 by architect Filippo Calendario also known for the Doge’s Palace.

Once the hotel is open, passengers on the Orient Express La Dolce Vita train can disembark at Venice Santa Lucia station and reach the hotel by boat or on foot.

Stephen Alden, CEO Raffles and Orient Express, Accor, said: “The arrival of Orient Express in Venice resonates naturally with the brand’s history. It marks a return to the sources of a legend which finds its ultimate expression in the Palazzo Donà Giovannelli.

“Inspired by her multicultural background, her passion for Venice and her unique poetic language, Aline Asmar from Amman will sublimate the design of one of the most charismatic palaces in the world.”

Paul BarletteCEO of Arsenale SpA, added: “The strategic union between Venice and the new Orient Express hotel represents another important step in the objective that Arsenale pursues through the partnership with Orient Express, namely the revival of luxury tourism. which highlights the unprecedented artistic potential and cultural heritage of our Italian peninsula.

“Palazzo Donà Giovannelli will become a unique landmark in Venice with its exceptional design, history and heritage. The meticulous care and eclectic experience of Aline Asmar of Amman will shed new light on the ancient beauty of the Palazzo, helping to spread a message of Venice excellence around the world.

Tribute to the site’s past

The 45-key hotel will pay homage to its site and to the heritage of Venice. Each room and suite will overlook the gardens and canals and public areas will include a gourmet Italian restaurant, a hotel bar reminiscent of the former piano nobile ballroom and hidden rooftop terraces.

The ground floor consists of several salons and ballrooms with 800 years of history to tell, mixing Baroque, Neoclassical and Gothic styles with oriental inspiration. Each room is distinguished by its decor of motifs, mosaics, stuccoes, paintings and frescoes.

“Orient Express Venice embodies a unique encounter between two icons: the legendary luxury brand and Palazzo Donà Giovannelli,” said Aline Asmar from Amman.

“Architectural feat at the crossroads of cultures, a link between East and West, the flagship building is anchored in eternity and ready to be reborn with a theatrical and contemporary art of living, imbued with infinite elegance. .

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A San Diego County COVID hotel guest’s struggle to find permanent accommodation https://gillansinn.com/a-san-diego-county-covid-hotel-guests-struggle-to-find-permanent-accommodation/ Sat, 14 May 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/a-san-diego-county-covid-hotel-guests-struggle-to-find-permanent-accommodation/ A Linda McDowell in tears after a long day looking for an apartment in downtown San Diego. (Zoë Meyers/inewsource) By Zoe Meyers and Cody Dulaney | new source Linda McDowell got goosebumps after visiting a downtown apartment a few blocks from the San Diego Bay. It was spacious enough for her 6-year-old pit bull named […]]]>
Linda McDowell
A Linda McDowell in tears after a long day looking for an apartment in downtown San Diego. (Zoë Meyers/inewsource)

By Zoe Meyers and Cody Dulaney | new source

Linda McDowell got goosebumps after visiting a downtown apartment a few blocks from the San Diego Bay. It was spacious enough for her 6-year-old pit bull named Stella, and with a park down the street, it seemed perfect. She almost couldn’t believe it would be the first place to be called since before the pandemic.

On the way to the bank to get money to hold the apartment, Linda sang aloud, “I’m gettin’ an apartment,” incorporating her own version of the Sam Cooke classic, “We’re havin’ ‘ a party. Dance to the music.

For more than a year, Linda and Stella have lived in a San Diego County-run hotel in Old Town, which was used to temporarily house people with pre-existing health conditions during the coronavirus pandemic. She is one of dozens of others still staying at the hotel as trouble the program is at risk of ending a month earlier than expected.

The other guests only have a few weeks to find a new place to live, or they will be sent to a homeless shelter. A county spokesperson said officials are doing all they can to help and pointed to the number of housing grants that have been awarded.

Linda is one of 30 guests who received a Section 8 Voucher, a form of government assistance that helps low-income residents pay for housing, and it gave her peace of mind knowing she would have financial support to cover the monthly rent of $2,445. Even so, she learned how difficult it can still be to find a home in San Diego.

“It’s been a long journey,” she said.

The hotel shelter program was relax since the start of the year, and county staff and contractors are expected to work with clients to help them find housing. But for the past few weeks, Linda said she hadn’t been getting the help she needed, so she decided to start touring and applying for units on her own.

So far, she hasn’t been successful and she fears she won’t be able to find accommodation before the program ends.

County officials still haven’t told guests when to exit the hotel, but time is running out.

Read the full article on inewsource.org.

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San Diego County COVID-19 hotel guest struggles to find accommodation https://gillansinn.com/san-diego-county-covid-19-hotel-guest-struggles-to-find-accommodation/ Thu, 12 May 2022 12:45:00 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/san-diego-county-covid-19-hotel-guest-struggles-to-find-accommodation/ Linda McDowell got goosebumps after visiting a downtown apartment a few blocks from the San Diego Bay. It was spacious enough for her 6-year-old pit bull named Stella, and with a park down the street, it seemed perfect. She almost couldn’t believe it would be the first place to be called since before the pandemic. […]]]>

Linda McDowell got goosebumps after visiting a downtown apartment a few blocks from the San Diego Bay. It was spacious enough for her 6-year-old pit bull named Stella, and with a park down the street, it seemed perfect. She almost couldn’t believe it would be the first place to be called since before the pandemic.

On the way to the bank to get money to hold the apartment, Linda sang aloud, “I’m gettin’ an apartment,” incorporating her own version of the Sam Cooke classic, “We’re havin’ ‘ a party. Dance to the music.

why it matters

A San Diego County spokesperson said officials are doing everything possible to help house the remaining guests of a struggling pandemic program that has cost more than $100 million.

For more than a year, Linda and Stella have lived in a San Diego County-run hotel in Old Town, which was used to temporarily house people with pre-existing health conditions during the coronavirus pandemic. She is among dozens of others who are still staying at the hotel as the troubled schedule risks ending a month earlier than expected.

The other guests only have a few weeks to find a new place to live, or they will be sent to a homeless shelter. A county spokesperson said officials were doing everything possible to help and highlighted the number of housing grants that have been awarded.

Linda McDowell waits for the elevator in a building in downtown San Diego, May 4, 2022. (Zoë Meyers/inewsource)

Linda is one of 30 guests who received a Section 8 Voucher, a form of government assistance that helps low-income residents pay for housing, and it has given her peace of mind knowing she will have financial support to cover the monthly rent of $2,445. Even so, she learned how difficult it can still be to find a home in San Diego.

“It’s been a long journey,” she said.

The hotel shelter program has been winding down since the start of the year, and county staff and contractors are expected to work with clients to help them find accommodations. But over the past few weeks, Linda said she hasn’t been getting the help she needs, so she’s decided to start touring and applying for units on her own.

One sunny afternoon last week, Linda drove south in her Kia Soul on the I-5 freeway to visit an apartment near San Diego’s Seaport Village. After living and raising a family for 23 years in Point Loma Heights, she was reluctant to move to the more urban area.

But that changed when Linda turned into the street of the building.

“It’s going to be so nice, it’s so close to the water!” Linda said, looking in all directions, trying to take it all in at once. “I could just walk outside and be on the water. Look at this! Ahhh!”

Linda was hoping to rent a one-bedroom unit with a large closet and lots of storage space. When management showed her around a model studio on the first floor, she was pleased to see that even the studio was spacious. Her face was filled with a mixture of excitement and disbelief as she looked around.

Linda McDowell receives paperwork from the Resident Services office of an apartment building in downtown San Diego, May 4, 2022. (Zoë Meyers/inewsource)

At the Resident Services office, staff handed Linda an application for a 585-square-foot one-bedroom unit on the second-floor corner, overlooking the courtyard. They said they could keep it for her if she came back after 2:15 p.m. with the completed application and a deposit.

First, she needed the money. So she jumped in her car and drove to a nearby 7-Eleven to use an ATM. Then, sitting in the driver’s seat outside the store, she began filling out the application.

“Oh god, my nerves,” Linda said with a deep sigh.

Reading aloud from the “Residential History” app, she said, thinking about what to write.

“I hate job applications. Residential…” she paused, then wrote the name of the hotel where she has been living for over a year.

Getting nervous every second, she continued. But the type and number of questions on the application acted as stumbling blocks: Name of employer? Have you ever been expelled?

Linda lives off Social Security and Disability benefits, and delivers food for DoorDash next door. She first experienced homelessness after being evicted from her Point Loma Heights home in February 2020. She was living and paying rent with her brother, but after his death in 2018 the payments started piling up .

After the eviction, Linda lived in her car in a secure car park managed by a non-profit association, Jewish family service, before qualifying for a room in the county’s hotel program due to his medical condition. She has a good credit rating, she says, and only owes money on her car. Even so, she feared the eviction would be a problem and hoped it wouldn’t show up in the credit check.

Linda said she had already discussed these concerns with the people who were supposed to help her find accommodation – employees with Equus Workforce Solutionsthe contractor who has come under scrutiny for mishandling the program – and they led her to believe that her Section 8 voucher would be the key to getting her into an apartment.

Linda McDowell withdraws money for apartment application fees at a 7-Eleven in downtown San Diego, May 4, 2022. (Zoë Meyers/inewsource)

Once Linda completed the application, the next step was to find a bank for a money order. Feeling elated now, Linda burst into her rendition of Cooke’s “Having a party.”

“You know what song I sing, don’t you?” she asked, before getting back into the air, “We’re having a party.” Everyone dances. I take an apartment.

With her rental application, Linda needed $200 for the deposit and $45 for a credit check. She tried to obtain money orders from two different banks, but without success. She then went to a payday loan store in the Gaslamp Quarter. It was already approaching 2:15 p.m., the time Linda hoped to be back at the building. She wanted her request to be processed as soon as possible.

On the way back to the rental office, she began to worry about the costs. After paying to keep the unit, a credit check, storage fees and other moving costs, would she be fed up if the utility company also asked for a deposit? If she could move in quickly, she might be able to save on storage, she said.

“That would be really great.”

She arrived an hour later than she wanted, but the front desk still accepted her request and orders, and she decided to take the elevator to see the rooftop pool.

Linda McDowell expresses her excitement from the rooftop terrace of the building she hopes to rent an apartment in, in San Diego on May 4, 2022. (Zoë Meyers/inewsource)

“Look at that boat! Look at that water! You have a view! she said looking over the edge. “Down this street is a park for Stella.”

She took a deep breath and said, “I’m going to cry. Not yet. I will cry when he tells me the news.

The news broke just as Linda was returning to her car. Her cell phone rang and it was the rental agent. He had called during a rental history check. It’s not the same as a credit check, he explained. Linda’s face sagged.

Linda McDowell receives a call from a leasing agent while her apartment application is being processed, San Diego, May 4, 2022. (Zoë Meyers/inewsource)

“The eviction happened,” she said, referring to the Point Loma Heights apartment she occupied for 23 years. She still has $36,000 in rental debt with the landlord.

“Now I’m really going to cry.”

The only way she could get into that apartment, the agent said, was to reduce that debt to zero.

“What am I going to do? Zero balance. It’s going to be a miracle,” she said almost in shock, repeating one word over and over: “Wow.

“Who will praise (to me)? she wondered. “It means wherever and wherever I go (apply).”

Deflated, Linda called her contact at the San Diego Housing Commission on the way back to her hotel in Old Town and left a message, asking if there was anything that could be done to help.

She came back to the hotel, walked over to a 15ft travel trailer parked on the street and said, “See that little gem? It’s mine.”

The interior has been elaborately painted and decorated, with a small chandelier hanging above a twin bed. Something to fall back on.

Linda McDowell cries after learning she may be denied a rental apartment she applied for in downtown San Diego on May 4, 2022. (Zoë Meyers/inewsource)

“Good thing I have that,” she said, fighting back tears. “I just don’t know what to do. »

County officials still haven’t told guests when to exit the hotel, but time is running out. She said she could pay $450 a month to park the trailer at a campground, but that’s only if they agree. And then she wondered about her stored stuff and whether her little sedan would be able to haul the trailer around town.

“My heart is hurting me.”

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Seven years after selling DTC Hotel, company says it still owes $11.5 million – The Denver Post https://gillansinn.com/seven-years-after-selling-dtc-hotel-company-says-it-still-owes-11-5-million-the-denver-post/ Sun, 08 May 2022 20:51:36 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/seven-years-after-selling-dtc-hotel-company-says-it-still-owes-11-5-million-the-denver-post/ Seven years ago, a newly formed hotel investment firm in Denver proudly touted its purchase of a Best Western Plus in the Denver Tech Center for $15 million. “The property has all the characteristics we are looking for in an acquisition – high current yield, excellent location, superior brand image and a variety of healthy […]]]>

Seven years ago, a newly formed hotel investment firm in Denver proudly touted its purchase of a Best Western Plus in the Denver Tech Center for $15 million.

“The property has all the characteristics we are looking for in an acquisition – high current yield, excellent location, superior brand image and a variety of healthy demand drivers,” said Phillip Hutchins, co-founder of the Rockies company. Lodging Capital, in a press release.

But on April 28, Hutchins, his co-founder Stephen Mills and RLC were sued in Arapahoe County District Court by DTC Hotel LLC, which claims he was not paid approximately $11.5 million. dollars still owed to him for the sale of the 149-room Best Western at 9231 E. Arapahoe Road.

According to DTC Hotel, which is based in Greenwood Village, RLC signed an $11.5 million promissory note and took out a $200,000 loan for repairs to the hotel in April 2015. DTC says the company owes him $11.3 million on the promissory note and the full $200,000 of the loan, plus interest, late fees and attorney fees.

“The pandemic has had a significant negative impact on our hotel real estate operations, with losses approaching $2 million over the past two years resulting in default,” Mills said in an email. “We are actively working with our lender towards a resolution that includes a repayment of their loan against the property.”

“We expect to close the recapitalization of the property within the next 60 days, which will result in the dismissal of the (lawsuit) filing after the loan is repaid,” Mills added.

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San Francisco hotel staff battle overdose crisis https://gillansinn.com/san-francisco-hotel-staff-battle-overdose-crisis/ Thu, 05 May 2022 13:01:26 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/san-francisco-hotel-staff-battle-overdose-crisis/ Hotel staff like Laverne Taylor can relate to guests. She says she was addicted to drugs as a teenager and lived on the streets. She remembers getting high just to stay warm. Taylor served several stints in prison before being sentenced to life for murder. After serving 26 years behind bars, she was released in […]]]>

Hotel staff like Laverne Taylor can relate to guests. She says she was addicted to drugs as a teenager and lived on the streets. She remembers getting high just to stay warm.

Taylor served several stints in prison before being sentenced to life for murder. After serving 26 years behind bars, she was released in 2019 when the then Governor. Jerry Brown commuted his sentence. Soon after, she was working at the Whitcomb Hotel.

Taylor says her heart broke watching guests struggle to adjust to life indoors after years on the streets.

“You had people you were getting off the streets, literally, and you put them all in a [three]-star hotel,” Taylor said. “You would see the room and it looked like it had been torn down, tents in there. We could not understand. ‘Why do you have a tent in there?'”

She said some people needed help even with mundane tasks like turning on showers or using TV remotes.

Taylor has used CPR on guests more than a dozen times and attempted to revive people after overdoses – usually successfully, but sometimes not.

She was working at the Whitcomb Hotel the day Sterling Ulrich died. She had become closer to Ulrich, who was just beginning to open up to the staff.

When Taylor heard the emergency call on the hotel radio with Ulrich’s name, her heart raced. When she found Ulrich, she began CPR, combining mouth breathing and chest compressions with another colleague, until it became clear that they could not save Ulrich.

“It’s like a scene from a bad movie where people try and try and try until someone takes them away,” Taylor said.

Staff need ongoing trauma counseling

Shortly after the Whitcomb Hotel opened to vulnerable residents, an organization called the Harm Reduction Therapy Center began providing counseling to staff who were seeing overdoses.

Harm Reduction Therapy Center leadership team at a holiday gathering. Left to right: Nathan Kamps-Hughes, program coordinator and staff therapist; Abigail McMorrow, staff therapist; Maurice Byrd, director of training and business operations; Maxx Malloy, staff therapist; Irina Alexander, staff therapist; Jason Brown, program coordinator and staff therapist; and Anna Berg, program director. (Courtesy of Anna Berg)

Anna Berg is a clinical social worker for the centre. She says the Whitcomb Hotel has become a microcosm of the city’s multiple social crises. The same mental health and addictions issues that were happening every day on the streets were now happening under one roof, and that had an impact on the staff. She said the staff there needed long-term support rather than after overdoses and other emergencies.

She said staff trauma was a major unintended consequence of these hotels.

“Seeing someone go through trauma is still trauma – those repeated exposures that staff go through to incredibly traumatic life or death events and you feel responsible for it, even though you’re not. “, she said.

Brandi Marshall took a job with Five Keys in November specifically to meet the need for staff support. She says it is difficult to work at the Whitcomb Hotel, where guests continue to use deadly drugs after overdoses.

Marshall served in the military and volunteered to return to Iraq shortly after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. She said that because of the trauma she experienced watching people die while she was in the military, she knows how to block out some of the emotional aspects of her job at the hotel.

“I mastered this art from Iraq,” she said. “[My co-workers] really absorbed a lot, coming out of prison. They absorb everything that happens around them.

Monique LeSarre, executive director of the Rafiki Coalition for Health and Wellness, a nonprofit organization aimed at reducing health inequities in underserved communities, said her therapists counseled staff at the Whitcomb Hotel in crisis.

“[Staff are] bring people back to life, [people] who then roll over and die the next day,” LeSarre said. “Their own mental health is suffering. It’s really unethical, really, really, really unethical, not to provide the right level of support.

Dawn Koch, a guest at the Whitcomb Hotel, speaks with a Five Keys staff member (not pictured) at the Whitcomb Hotel in San Francisco on February 18, 2022. (Beth LaBerge/KQED)

LeSarre said she applied for funding for mental health support from the San Francisco Department of Homelessness and Supportive Housing. But, she says, the agency turned down the grant proposal.

Asked about it, Denny Machuca-Grebe, spokesperson for the agency, responded in a written statement.

“While agencies provide day-to-day support and services to people facing many mental health, addictions and housing issues, we are acutely aware of the difficulty of serving vulnerable communities while taking care of ourselves in as individuals,” he said. wrote.

Machuca-Grebe did not respond to KQED’s question about what efforts may be underway to support the mental health of shelter-in-place hotel staff.

He said to contact Five Keys to find out what steps the nonprofit is taking to support its staff.

Marshall says she and other employees are starting to open up more about some of the trauma they face. Five Keys has launched support groups for employees, including a group for women. At first, only one or two people attended these sessions. Now dozens of people are showing up, Marshall said, talking about everything from their own deceased children to reversing overdoses.

Steps towards stability

Dawn Koch has lived at the Whitcomb Hotel since last August and wants to start a group for hotel residents to support each other. She carries Narcan with her everywhere and says creating a sense of community is also an important part of harm reduction.

“There are too many people who are so lost that they don’t even know each other anymore. Unless you have someone to help you from then on, you feel like you are always lost,” she said.

“I really saw too many people here one minute and left the next,” she said.

Another hotel resident, Teddy Melendez, uses fentanyl on the sidewalk so people are nearby to save him if he overdoses. People regularly gather in front of the hotel and use drugs.

Melendez said he uses less fentanyl because he takes drugs to reduce cravings and relieve withdrawal pain.

“I want to have my own place, have my own apartment. For me to do that, I have to stop using,” he said.

San Francisco officials plan to end the city’s emergency hotel program in September. Until now, just over half of clients considered eligible for housing under the program found it, and it is mostly permanent housing. Eligibility is based on a number of factors, such as a person’s health or how long they have been homeless.

Eldridge Cruse, the hotel supervisor, tells staff to focus on the overdoses they reversed rather than the people they couldn’t save.

“You have to have x-ray vision or cameras in every room and monitor every room to figure out what’s going on. But you can’t,” Cruse said. “We received the hand and played it as best we could. No loss of life is acceptable. But we couldn’t prevent what was about to happen. We could not.

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Visitor sues Hawaii hotel after recommending beach https://gillansinn.com/visitor-sues-hawaii-hotel-after-recommending-beach/ Tue, 03 May 2022 17:10:38 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/visitor-sues-hawaii-hotel-after-recommending-beach/ HONOLULU (KHON2) — Imagine you’re a hotel employee and a visitor asks you to recommend “a good family beach.” If that visitor is injured on the beach you recommended, can you or the hotel be held responsible for those injuries? That’s what a visitor to Hawaii tried to prove in a lawsuit. But a court […]]]>

HONOLULU (KHON2) — Imagine you’re a hotel employee and a visitor asks you to recommend “a good family beach.” If that visitor is injured on the beach you recommended, can you or the hotel be held responsible for those injuries?

That’s what a visitor to Hawaii tried to prove in a lawsuit. But a court in Hawaii has ruled that the Maui resort was not responsible for the injuries he suffered after traveling to a beach several miles away on the recommendation of their employee and becoming paralyzed.

The incident happened in August 2012 while the visitor and his family were vacationing in Maui. In response to her request for a “good beach” they could visit, the hotel employee suggested Big Beach and provided driving directions, according to court documents.

The visitor and his family then drove to Makena State Park – a state-owned park – and parked in a lot adjacent to Big Beach where they stood near a lookout tower.

According to court documents, the walkway connecting the northernmost parking lot to Big Beach contained a permanent ‘Dangerous Shorebreak’ sign reading ‘WARNING’ in bold letters above a pictogram of a person upside down after hitting a wave. Under the pictogram it says “Waves break in shallow water”, “Serious injuries can occur even in small waves” and “IF IN DOUBT, DO NOT GO OUT”.

FILE — A sign warns swimmers of the dangerous shorebreak.

There were additional signs with red flags throughout the area and lifeguards made warning announcements over the public address system during the day, according to court documents. The visitor, however, claimed that he did not recall hearing these announcements. He also didn’t remember seeing the warning signs along the way, near the parking lot or on the beach, he said.

Court documents say the visitor waded through the water to join his family, who entered before him. He jumped in the waves for about 10 minutes before deciding to get out.

“As he began a half-walk, half-stroke toward the shore, a breaking wave hit him from behind, causing his head to hit the sandy bottom of the ocean.”

Court documents

The visitor’s neck became hypertensive, resulting in permanent paralysis, according to court documents.

The documents say the visitor filed a second amended complaint alleging he suffered a crippling injury because the hotel employee negligently recommended this beach without providing any warning of the dangers of the ocean. The hotel claimed it had no obligation to notify her of the shorebreak as the beach was located miles away and was not affiliated with or under the control of the hotel. The hotel also stated that there were warning signs on the beach and thus warned the visitor of the danger he might face.

According to court documents, the visitor also sought summary judgment and argued:

  • Innkeepers have an increased duty to warn their guests of foreseeable dangers, regardless of their geographic location.
  • Even though the hotel had no duty to warn, it did so by negligently recommending Big Beach.
  • The shorebreak warning signs were not relevant to the facts of this case.

The Circuit Court found that the hotel “had no general duty to warn its guests of dangers far beyond” the hotel’s properties and rejected the visitor’s argument that the hotel had assumed the obligation to warn when recommending the beach since the employee “made no representations or guarantees regarding safety.”

Further, the Circuit Court said that even if the hotel had a duty to warn or assumed a duty to warn, “there can be no liability at law” because warnings were posted at Big Beach on the day in question, and these warnings were heeded HRS § 663-1.56.

The Circuit Court issued its final judgment on May 19, 2017. The Hawaii Intermediate Court of Appeals affirmed the dismissal of the case on March 31, 2022.

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NH firefighters will provide an update on Saturday’s Red Jacket Hotel fire at a press conference https://gillansinn.com/nh-firefighters-will-provide-an-update-on-saturdays-red-jacket-hotel-fire-at-a-press-conference/ Sun, 01 May 2022 17:52:09 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/nh-firefighters-will-provide-an-update-on-saturdays-red-jacket-hotel-fire-at-a-press-conference/ The New Hampshire State Fire Marshal’s Office and the North Conway Fire Department will hold a press conference at 2 p.m., the state Fire Marshal’s Office announced Sunday. On Saturday, New Hampshire Department of Safety emergency crews received a 911 call reporting the hotel fire at 2:47 p.m., the fire marshal’s office said in a […]]]>

The New Hampshire State Fire Marshal’s Office and the North Conway Fire Department will hold a press conference at 2 p.m., the state Fire Marshal’s Office announced Sunday.

On Saturday, New Hampshire Department of Safety emergency crews received a 911 call reporting the hotel fire at 2:47 p.m., the fire marshal’s office said in a statement.

Responding teams saw heavy gunfire and smoke billowing from the hotel, located at 2251 White Mountain Highway, the statement said.

The three injured were treated at the scene and transported to Memorial Hospital as a precaution, according to the Office of the Fire Marshal.

Crews from at least 18 nearby communities assisted firefighters in North Conway, who faced strong gusts of wind as they battled the blazes on Saturday, according to the fire marshal’s office.

Guests staying at the Red Jacket have been offered shelter at another nearby resort, the fire marshal’s office said in a statement Saturday.

Knudsen said the hotel will remain closed for the near future and management is working to accommodate the needs of staff and guests who were on the property during the fire. The hotel is also contacting people who have made reservations, she said.

“We are extremely grateful to them and for the outpouring of support from the local community to help our guests and staff,” Knudsen said. “We are truly touched by their spirit of giving.”

The North Conway property, part of the Red Jacket resort chain, was purchased by New York-based EOS Investors in the fall, the company said in a November statement.

The Red Jacket chain includes five resorts on Cape Cod, as well as the North Conway Hotel, according to the company.

The North Conway Hotel was opened on July 4, 1971, according to an online story. In 2008, the 40,000 square foot Kahuna Laguna indoor water park was added to the 150-room hotel.

For several years in the 1970s and 1980s, the red jacket was the focus of the Volvo International Tennis Tournament when it was held in North Conway. The tennis stars would cover the few miles between the contest site and the hotel by helicopter, the Globe reported during the 1979 tournament.

At the crowded bar of the Red Jacket, stars staying at the hotel would rehash the day’s events over a drink; a Globe reported referring to “baseline winners,” “topspin,” and “deep” second serves.

Kendra Price, then 22 and working as one of the bartenders, said in a post that some of the tennis stars were great – luminaries like Arthur Ashe, Manuel Orantes and John Alexander.

“They tip so well,” Price said.

During the 1984 tournament, hotel manager Carl Lindblade told The Globe that the tournament was “a spiritual high point for us”.

“The world comes to us once a year and brings hundreds of thousands of dollars with them,” Lindblade said.


John Hilliard can be contacted at john.hilliard@globe.com.

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Curator Hotel and Resort Collection Uses Canary Technologies to Process Credit Card Payments More Securely and Efficiently | https://gillansinn.com/curator-hotel-and-resort-collection-uses-canary-technologies-to-process-credit-card-payments-more-securely-and-efficiently/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 17:16:24 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/curator-hotel-and-resort-collection-uses-canary-technologies-to-process-credit-card-payments-more-securely-and-efficiently/ With Canary’s digital permissions solution, Curator member properties will be able to send each guest a unique link so they can enter their credit card information through a secure, PCI-compliant online form, instead having to fill out paper forms in person at check-in. in. 29.04.2022 Curator Hotel & Resort Collection has selected Canary Technologies as […]]]>
With Canary’s digital permissions solution, Curator member properties will be able to send each guest a unique link so they can enter their credit card information through a secure, PCI-compliant online form, instead having to fill out paper forms in person at check-in. in.


29.04.2022

Curator Hotel & Resort Collection has selected Canary Technologies as a preferred vendor for its digital permissions solution. As part of the agreement, Canary will provide digital credit card authorizations to support Curator’s collection of independent hotels and resorts.

With Canary’s digital permissions solution, Curator member properties will be able to send each guest a unique link so they can enter their credit card information through a secure, PCI-compliant online form, instead having to fill out paper forms in person at check-in. in. Hotels will also have access to Canary’s web-based dashboard to track each guest’s digital clearance online.

Canary’s digital authorizations are fully compliant with Payment Card Industry (PCI) standards that all businesses must adhere to if they capture, process, transmit or store credit or debit card information. Since most paper credit card authorization forms are not PCI compliant, Canary’s digital authorizations product offers Curator’s hotels a more secure solution while helping them avoid substantial penalties. up to $500,000 for violating PCI requirements.

Canary’s digital authorizations also help merchants avoid errors and fraud often associated with the process of collecting credit card information on paper forms: hotels using digital authorizations have reported a 90% decrease in chargebacks.

“Canary’s digital authorizations were an obvious choice given its ease of implementation, user-friendly interface and track record of reducing chargebacks, and we are excited to be able to leverage the benefits of this impactful technology for our members,” said Conservative Vice President Austin. Segal.

“We are honored to have been chosen as a preferred vendor by Curator and look forward to helping its members take full advantage of the ease, efficiency and security of our digital credit card authorization process. .said Canary co-founder Harman Singh Narula.

In addition to digital permissions, Canary offers a range of products that meet the specific needs of the hospitality industry. Its product list also includes contactless check-in, which allows customers to check in virtually without exchanging credit cards, IDs or registration forms; Contactless payment, which allows hotels to know when customers will leave their hotel and increase their reviews; Guest Messages, which allows guests and staff to easily communicate via SMS; Upsells, which allows hotels to generate more than $100,000 per year in upsell revenue; and digital contracts, which increase staff efficiency and bookings. These industry-leading solutions help forward-thinking hotels improve their business processes and results while improving customer service for their valued guests.

Does your company have any news that it would like to share with our readers? If so, we invite you to view our editorial guidelines and submit your press release for publication consideration.

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A closer look at hotel room rates in Las Vegas as thousands are expected https://gillansinn.com/a-closer-look-at-hotel-room-rates-in-las-vegas-as-thousands-are-expected/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 00:56:29 +0000 https://gillansinn.com/a-closer-look-at-hotel-room-rates-in-las-vegas-as-thousands-are-expected/ LAS VEGAS (KLAS) – The NFL Draft takes place on Thursday and many people traveling to the Las Vegas Valley are still looking for affordable hotel rooms. Shaundell Newsome has lived in the Valley for more than 30 years, he tells 8 News Now he’s more than ready to experience the NFL Draft this week […]]]>

LAS VEGAS (KLAS) – The NFL Draft takes place on Thursday and many people traveling to the Las Vegas Valley are still looking for affordable hotel rooms.

Shaundell Newsome has lived in the Valley for more than 30 years, he tells 8 News Now he’s more than ready to experience the NFL Draft this week with his brothers.

“I’m really excited, I mean, when do you get to have that kind of experience like a huge tailgate party and with the NFL Draft?” he said. “Well, you know my brothers and I, before COVID-19, would go to a different city every year and watch a New York Giants football game no matter where we went.”

For Newsome, finding the perfect bedroom has been in the works for about 4 months.

“Usually they were only there August last year so they saw the prices were a bit higher than when they came back last summer. So you know they went out and have do a little more shopping,” he told 8 News Now. “They have different rooms, like one of my brothers who stays at the north end of the Strat and then my other brothers who stay at off the strip.”

On Monday, 8 News Now reviewed hotel room rates for Thursday on the first day of the 2022 NFL Draft.

  • Gold nugget $166
  • Resort World $139
  • Caesars Palace $225
  • South Point $299

“They come from all over, so we’re used to being scattered as long as we get together, and we can root for the Giant,” Newsome said.

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