Design hotel Palazzo Daniele with nine suites in Puglia – COOL HUNTING®

Some hotels exist to take care of vacations; other hotels are the vacation itself. Deep in the ‘heel of the boot’ that defines the sunny Italian region of Puglia, Palazzo Daniele is the latter. This five-star property combines minimalist and modern design with the architectural majesty of a neoclassical palace built in 1861. There are just nine suites, wrapped around a central open-air courtyard, coupled with an outdoor swimming pool and common living areas with vaulted ceilings and restored frescoes. It is a tranquil and colorful grandeur that invites guests to live a simply extraordinary experience.

Courtesy of Serena Eller

Palazzo Daniele stands in the village of Gagliano del Capo. Cliffside cocktails with sunset views in Santa Maria di Leuca and morning swims among the rocks under Ponte Ciolo are minutes away. Day trips to Gallipoli or a number of historic seaside destinations are easily accessible. But when customers arrive at Palazzo Daniele, they may wonder why they are leaving. Designed in collaboration with Ludovica and Roberto Palomba, with the artistic direction of Francesco Petrucci, the hotel will win you over from the private entrance.

Courtesy of Serena Eller

Site-specific contemporary art installations work in tandem with the historic stone structure and its restored mosaics. Public spaces offer anachronistic surprises alongside thoughtful touches. The spacious and uncluttered bedrooms incorporate steel-framed wardrobes; bathrooms, often defined by unique shapes and features, include Malin + Goetz toiletries. Contemporary amenities are omnipresent.

Courtesy of Serena Eller

“I was immediately won over by Palazzo Daniele when I saw it for the first time; the building and its history have this power to attract people, ”said hotelier Gabriele Salini of the property. It is his second hotel, along with Palazzo Daniele’s brother, G-Rough, which gives life to a 17th-century mansion near Piazza Navona in Rome. “I was actually looking for another project that would fit perfectly into my GS Collection portfolio and I knew it would be my next venture,” he says. Both embody the ethic of “questa casa non è un albergo”, which translates to “this house is not a hotel”. They are something more.

Courtesy of Renée Kemps

From preserving the structure to the design decisions that give it a contemporary touch, Palazzo Daniele has required significant development to bring it into the warm and welcoming destination it is today. “Being a place as historic as the noble palace of the Daniele family since 1861, the property exhibited a lot of stratification of its objects and furniture, without too much flow,” says Salini. “In terms of a structural project – creating an interior / exterior continuity, which did not exist in the architecture of Puglia in the 19th century – our aim was to bring the palace back to its essential elements, where the exposed walls bear the cracks of time and the monastic beds take center stage, while increasing the grandeur of the original frescoes on the ceiling and mosaic floor.

Courtesy of Serena Eller

Nestled in architecture and design, Palazzo Daniele’s food and drink program includes a loyalty bar in a disused altar (open day and night), as well as an outdoor kitchen where the friendly cooks and staff cook something delicious during and in between. meal. Customers can drop by whenever they feel obligated. However, for dinner reservations must be made in advance.

“Making our visitors feel at home in an authentic Italian setting has been my vision for the entire property,” said Salini. “Most Italian homes, including mine, serve simple dishes made with the freshest ingredients; this is how we serve our extraordinary Italian cuisine to our guests. The dishes are enchanting, the desserts incorporating in particular fresh fruit, and the cocktail program meets international expectations. Unsurprisingly, private cooking lessons are also available as an activity.

Courtesy of Enrico Costantini

“Our open-air kitchen is adjacent to the lush gardens of Palazzo Daniele and allows guests to enter and exit freely, seeing how our chefs prepare their food,” adds Salini. Beyond the kitchen, the heated swimming pool stretches out under the sun. Hammocks swing from the trees of the neighboring orangery. A rear rotunda, called the Kaffeehaus, accommodates those looking for a covered outdoor space. Customers find nooks and crannies outside and inside. In fact, even when fully occupied, the hotel feels like it’s entirely yours.

Courtesy of Serena Eller

“Palazzo Daniele and G-Rough are representative of how limits can be turned into possibilities,” says Salini. “The two projects align in their overall origin stories and their previous functions as two private palaces. However, each respective space has its own story to tell – in a sense, its own soul. He adds that GS Collection is “a concept of Italian hospitality that takes place in palaces and private homes with a familiar story to tell, a strong personality behind it and a real connection to the local neighborhood. My vision for the future of my collection is to take on unique projects emblematic of this and transform them into forward-thinking properties designed for connection, exploration and relaxation.

Courtesy of Renée Kemps

Palazzo Daniele certainly offers it all. Even in the event of rain during our stay, the staff prepared the stunning interior spaces to address the lack of availability outdoors. Beauty never diminished, only new attributes were brought to light. And, of course, when the rain subsided, the palace acted as a gateway to the many splendors of the area, although as we mentioned, even when we were exploring, our mind often returned to the attractive property.

Hero image by Renee Kemps


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