JFK Memorial Hospital now serving Eastern Coachella Valley as a Level 4 trauma center

JFK Memorial Hospital in Indio is now designated as a Level 4 Trauma Center.

Authorities celebrated Thursday morning at the hospital.

“As the first Level 4 trauma center in Riverside County and the premier trauma center in the East Coachella Valley, JFK Memorial Hospital will provide 24/7 advanced life support to patients in need. . Todd Burke, Media and Public Relations for Desert Care Network, said in a statement to News Channel 3 ahead of the event.

“This will provide a higher standard of care for residents of Indio and surrounding communities.”

Todd Burke, Desert Care Network

JFK Memorial Hospital President and CEO Gary Honts said the hospital’s new designation allows physicians to offer a wider range of medical care, including blunt trauma, falls and injuries. major head injuries, gunshots and knife wounds, burns, as well as automobile and motorcycle. accidents.

JFK can also manage cases of minor pediatric trauma, assess and transfer patients to its sister facility, Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs, if a higher standard of care is required.

According to Honts, JFK has treated 45 cases of trauma since he began offering trauma services on September 1, 2021.

According to the American Trauma Society, “Trauma center levels across the United States are identified in two ways: a designation process and a verification process. The different levels (ie Level I, II, III, IV or V) refer to the types of resources available in a trauma center and the number of patients admitted each year. These are categories that define the national standards for trauma care in hospitals.

In Riverside County, the Riverside County Ems Agency (REMSA) is implementing

The Desert Regional Medical Center is a level II trauma center. The only Level I trauma center in Riverside County is Riverside Community Hospital, which was designated in the summer of 2020. A list of verified trauma centers can be found in California here.

Trauma center levels, as defined by the American Trauma Society

The categories of trauma vary from state to state. Below are common criteria for trauma centers audited by ACS and also designated by states and municipalities. Facilities are designated / verified as adult and / or pediatric trauma centers. It is not uncommon for facilities to have different designations for each group (i.e. a trauma center can be a Level I adult facility and also a Level II pediatric facility).

Level I

The Level I Trauma Center is a comprehensive regional resource that is a tertiary care facility at the heart of the trauma system. A Level I trauma center is capable of providing comprehensive care for all aspects of injury, from prevention to rehabilitation.

The components of Level I trauma centers include:

  • 24-hour internal coverage by general surgeons and rapid availability of care in specialties such as orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, anesthesiology, emergency medicine, radiology, internal medicine, plastic surgery, care oral and maxillofacial, pediatric and critical.
  • Reference resource for communities in neighboring regions.
  • Provides leadership in prevention and public education to surrounding communities.
  • Provides ongoing training to members of the trauma team.
  • Incorporates a comprehensive quality assessment program.
  • Harnesses an organized educational and research effort to help guide new innovations in trauma care.
  • Drug addiction screening and patient intervention program.
  • Meets minimum requirements for the annual volume of critically injured patients.

Level II

A level II trauma center is able to initiate definitive care for all injured patients.

The components of Level II trauma centers include:

  • Immediate 24-hour coverage by general surgeons, as well as the specialties of orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, anesthesiology, emergency medicine, radiology and intensive care.
  • Tertiary care needs such as cardiac surgery, hemodialysis, and microvascular surgery may be referred to a level I trauma center.
  • Provides injury prevention and continuing education programs for staff.
  • Incorporates a comprehensive quality assessment program.

Level III

A Level III trauma center has demonstrated its ability to provide rapid assessment, resuscitation, surgery, intensive care and stabilization of injured patients and emergency operations.

The components of Level III trauma centers include:

  • Immediate 24-hour coverage by emergency physicians and rapid availability of general surgeons and anesthetists.
  • Incorporates a comprehensive quality assessment program.
  • Developed transfer agreements for patients requiring more comprehensive care in a level I or II trauma center.
  • Provides supportive care to rural and community hospitals.
  • Provides continuing education for nurses and paramedics or the trauma team.
  • Involved in prevention efforts and must have an active awareness program for its referent communities.

Level IV

A level IV trauma center has demonstrated its ability to provide advanced traumatic life support (ATLS) before transferring patients to a higher level trauma center. It offers assessment, stabilization and diagnostic capabilities for injured patients.

Elements of level IV trauma centers include:

  • Basic emergency department facilities to implement ATLS protocols and 24 hour laboratory coverage. Trauma nurse (s) and physicians available upon patient arrival.
  • May provide surgical and intensive care services if available.
  • Developed transfer agreements for patients requiring more comprehensive care in a level I or II trauma center.
  • Incorporates a comprehensive quality assessment program.
  • Involved in prevention efforts and must have an active awareness program for its referent communities.

Level V

A Level V trauma center provides initial assessment, stabilization and diagnostic capabilities and prepares patients for transfer to higher levels of care.

Components of Level V trauma centers include:

  • Basic emergency services facilities to implement ATLS protocols.
  • Trauma nurse (s) and doctors available when the patient arrives.
  • Out-of-hours activation protocols if the establishment is not open 24 hours a day.
  • Can provide surgical and intensive care services if available.
  • Developed transfer agreements for patients requiring more comprehensive care in level I to III trauma centers.

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