Wedding musicians sue hotel, vendors after tent collapses

Two musicians who were injured when a tent collapsed at an outdoor wedding last year accuse the venue and the vendors of neglect and denounce their “terrifying” experience.

Sisters Tiffany Ray, 37, and Amanda Crosby, 39, are violinists who were part of a string quartet at a wedding on January 11, 2020 at the St. Regis Atlanta.

During the ceremony – which took place on an outdoor terrace at the hotel – heavy storms caused the tent covering the ceremony to collapse on guests and vendors, including the string quartet.

Earlier this month, Ray and Crosby sued the hotel, its property management company, Tavistock Atlanta, as well as the tent company and the coordinator who oversaw the event, after sustaining “serious injuries,” according to the trial.

In March this year, another couple – who were invited to the wedding – also filed a lawsuit against the hotel, the tent company and the event coordinator. According to the lawsuit, a woman claims she was 32 weeks pregnant and suffered “serious physical injuries” after being pinned to the ground by a tent support beam. The couple, through their attorney, declined to comment for this story.

Lawyers for the St. Regis Atlanta also declined to comment.

The hotel’s property management company, Tavistock Group, did not respond to Fox News’ request for comment at the time of publication. Marriott International does not manage the hotel either.

Neither the tent company, Peachtree Tents & Events, nor the coordinator, Soiree, Inc., responded to Fox News’ request for comment. Lawyers for those companies, who were featured on the case documents, did not respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Ray, from Woodstock, Ga., Told Fox News that she and the rest of the string quartet “had no idea” the wedding was going to be held outside on the hotel’s seventh-floor patio. until their arrival the same day.

“We were all surprised,” Ray said, adding that they didn’t think too much about it and started to settle in and rehearse like they normally do for weddings.

By the time the ceremony began, Ray said it had started to rain and get windy. At one point, they even needed people to hold the speakers and keep them from tipping over in the wind.

Once the bride arrived in the aisle, Ray said the quartet had stopped playing and the wedding guests had started to sit down.

“Before I sat down, the whole tent, it all fell apart,” Ray said. “I was instantly under the debris. I was being pushed, I was kind of crushed on either side of my ribs and on my side and my hips. And I felt like I was in a trash compactor.

“I actually thought I was going to die,” she added. “It was so terrifying for the two or three seconds that I was in there, I was like, ‘Oh my God, I, I’m not going to do that. I’m not going to get out of it.

Crosby, of Bell Ground, Ga., Told Fox that when the tent collapsed she was confused at first.

“I saw the curtains blow and they went up really high, like that huge gust of wind, and covered the wedding coordinator, and then the next thing I know, I’m on the ground,” Crosby said. “I have no idea what happened. I am completely on the ground. My violin is nowhere to be found and I say to myself, why am I on the floor? “

According to their lawsuit, the defendants should have moved the marriage indoors and were therefore “negligent in not exercising ordinary diligence to ensure the safety of these premises and in not maintaining a safe environment”.
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She added that when she started realizing what had happened, she couldn’t see Ray, who was sitting right next to her.

Although she started calling her sister, Ray didn’t answer for what “seemed like an eternity,” Crosby said.

The sisters said they eventually found each other and were able to get inside and then to the hospital.

Clips provided to Fox News by the attorney representing the couple who were invited to the wedding show as the tent collapsed during the ceremony and the ensuing panic from the wedding guests as they attempted to get inside.

A report from January 13, 2020 from the local station WSB-TV found that several people were injured in the collapse and two people were sent to hospital.

According to a declaration of the national meteorological service (NWS) released after January 11, 2020, there were severe thunderstorms that day, which caused “extensive wind damage in the area” and there were even three weak tornadoes that occurred “in the storm line ”.

“At its peak, more than 150,000 customers across Georgia had lost power,” the agency said.

Although Ray and Crosby managed to get out of the debris, Ray told Fox she had seven broken ribs.

Crosby said she was in therapy for PTSD and her violin – which she had had for 20 years – was destroyed in the tent collapse, claiming they were “literal puzzle pieces” .

According to their lawsuit, Ray incurred medical bills and property damage over $ 20,000 and Crosby incurred medical bills and property damage over $ 21,000.

According to their lawsuit, the defendants should have moved the marriage indoors and were therefore “negligent in not exercising ordinary diligence to ensure the safety of these premises and in not maintaining a safe environment”.

“The defendants collectively knew and noticed that extreme and extreme weather conditions would affect the area of ​​Atlanta where the wedding was to take place and when the wedding was to take place,” the lawsuit said.

According to the lawsuit, which was filed in Fulton County State Court, Ray and Crosby are claiming the full cost of their “medical bills, property damage and lost wages.”


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